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Thread: Tamarack Subdivision - Avoid!

  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceebs View Post

    It took about 3 months to sell to house. We did not have triple pane windows, but we did have one of them huge pie lots - set back quite a ways from the train line. Having a big lot was good, but half of it extended on to the berm, which defeated the whole purpose of enjoying a big lot (except for tobogganing in winter.) A lot of people rejected the house based on that reason alone. I don't know how it is on the other side in Maple Crest. We weren't aware of any foundation problems in the first three years at least. I don't know about now. Don't have personal experience with the school, but I've heard good things about it.

    Triple pane windows might help with sound, but I doubt it'll do much for vibrations. But like I said, it's about your own tolerance level. When we bought, we were in a pretty desperate situation. We lived in an adult-only building and had a baby on the way, so we had to find a new place when there was a rental shortage everywhere. The value of the house with a huge lot seemed really good at the time, considering how hot the housing market was, and the mortgage was coming out to be lower than what we were paying for a one-bedroom in the university area. We knew about the train line, but because this was a start-up home, we thought we could put up with it for a few years. We had made a few trips to the area to check the noise level, and it didn't seem so bad until we started living there. I hate to admit it, but vibrations weren't something we even considered. It was a really REALLY stupid mistake on our part. I couldn't wait to get out. When I think back, I shudder. Sorry to sound so melodramatic, but I'm just giving you my personal opinion.
    Compare that painful experience with my neighbour who sold his home in August in a highly desired, quiet, mature neighbourhood, minutes from downtown. Sold it using ComFree in 10 days and received several offers. He accepted the one that was 10% above the appraised value. Home value increased 2.7 times what he paid in 2000
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  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Looking at google maps, and zooming into the newest 45 degree images, if emergency was to occur, there is 2 dirt roads that could be used to get out/in from meridian road... but yikes. You'd have to pay me to live here.
    and if you lived in la perle not only is there only one exit out, there is only one entrance in for emergency vehicles... you have to schedule your emergencies outside of rush hour or traffic accidents. if you want to fear monger you can do that anywhere, not just in tamarack.
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  3. #103

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    Sorry, I don't follow. Le Perle has several exits/entrances...

  4. #104

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    yes there are 2 exits/entrances for Maple Crest right now, 1 is temporary but that doesnt conern me too much, eventually there will be at least 2 permanent ones. Ive been down in that area several times and have only had to wait for a train once. The nice thing down there are the lot sizes vs other areas, I like a backyard where you can have a fire pit, a nice size deck and still have room for kids and a pet to run around.. went to the area last night and waited almost 2 hours and never heard a sound of a train, just total peace and quiet compared to where i live now in millwoods.. i know the trains run there regularily but in no matter what area you buy, whether its power lines/highways/ or trains theres usually a con, at this point the yard size and price as well as the couple different freeways close by is overiding my thoughts of the possible train vibration..

  5. #105

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    ^ Sounds like your mind was always made up.

    You asked people what they thought. You tuned into a thread where people expressed the multiple problems and concerns living there. Anybody thats lived there posting in the thread has had bad things to say about the experience. Unanimously.

    You're still talking about nice lot, backyard, barbecue.

    You really think its going to be all that enjoyable with trains roaring by kicking dust into everything and shaking everything up and hoping theres never a derailment? Accident. Spill. Contamination.

    People tried to dissuade you and I commend them for that.

    Frankly you've gone beyond buyer beware. You're at buyer ignore.

    Unfortunately you'll be likely to regret that.

    If I'm being unpleasant with this its the kindest thing I can do given the circumstance.

    ps Talking about peace and quiet next to two major freeways and next door to a train mainline is strange at best.
    Last edited by Replacement; 08-12-2012 at 12:01 AM.
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  6. #106

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    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well

  7. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well
    Fair enough but I've lived in Millwoods for a long time and I'm quite familiar with the whole area, train travel on that line, etc. I've been consistent in my stance on the thread and supportive of the people that got into this development early as they didn't have other people to turn to and ask about the user living experience. You have that benefit.

    I am curious, why not Laurel? Why also commit to something you know you won't be satisfied with for too long?

    Personally we bought a house we loved 24yrs ago, spent more than we had wanted to pay just to get into it and assume the mortgage, and benefitted immensely from that decision and being happy where we are and not having to move. The value of our house quadrupled. All we had to do was sit on the egg. Nor have we had the expense, aggravation, of moving, no further real estate, legal fees etc. Just plunk down, no fuss, enjoy, and make the place yours in every way. The benefit of living in one house for a longtime is you have that connection with everything inside and out. The memories are there and the place transform into a reflection of you, your family, your interests. In short it attains personality.

    Don't sell short what that can be worth.

    cheers as well for your pleasant demeanor. Sorry if I got out of line, just wanted you to be sure.
    Last edited by Replacement; 08-12-2012 at 11:07 AM.
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  8. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well
    Fair enough but I've lived in Millwoods for a long time and I'm quite familiar with the whole area, train travel on that line, etc. I've been consistent in my stance on the thread and supportive of the people that got into this development early as they didn't have other people to turn to and ask about the user living experience. You have that benefit.

    I am curious, why not Laurel? Why also commit to something you know you won't be satisfied with for too long?

    Personally we bought a house we loved 24yrs ago, spent more than we had wanted to pay just to get into it and assume the mortgage, and benefitted immensely from that decision and being happy where we are and not having to move. The value of our house quadrupled. All we had to do was sit on the egg. Nor have we had the expense, aggravation, of moving, no further real estate, legal fees etc. Just plunk down, no fuss, enjoy, and make the place yours in every way. The benefit of living in one house for a longtime is you have that connection with everything inside and out. The memories are there and the place transform into a reflection of you, your family, your interests. In short it attains personality.

    Don't sell short what that can be worth.

    cheers as well for your pleasant demeanor. Sorry if I got out of line, just wanted you to be sure.
    Hi again, just curious how you are familiar with the train line? do you know how often a day it runs? or the schedule?

  9. #109
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    cinsha, you would be well advised to phone CN and ask them, not only about current schedule but also future plans. There is a 1-888 number on their website.

    One thing is clear. The rail line will not be discontinued as it is CN's main line between Calgary and Edmonton (the line that runs parallel to Highway 2A is a CP line). The CN line you will be backing on to is part of their Class 1 network. CN recently built a marshalling yard just south of AHD in SE Edmonton. Zoom in on Google Maps for a close up look. The line directly connects to a massive new intermodal yard CN is building NE of Calgary. Details here: http://www.cn.ca/en/shipping-calgary-logistics-park.htm

    Expect the frequency, length and weight of trains using the line to grow in the years ahead.

  10. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well
    Fair enough but I've lived in Millwoods for a long time and I'm quite familiar with the whole area, train travel on that line, etc. I've been consistent in my stance on the thread and supportive of the people that got into this development early as they didn't have other people to turn to and ask about the user living experience. You have that benefit.

    I am curious, why not Laurel? Why also commit to something you know you won't be satisfied with for too long?

    Personally we bought a house we loved 24yrs ago, spent more than we had wanted to pay just to get into it and assume the mortgage, and benefitted immensely from that decision and being happy where we are and not having to move. The value of our house quadrupled. All we had to do was sit on the egg. Nor have we had the expense, aggravation, of moving, no further real estate, legal fees etc. Just plunk down, no fuss, enjoy, and make the place yours in every way. The benefit of living in one house for a longtime is you have that connection with everything inside and out. The memories are there and the place transform into a reflection of you, your family, your interests. In short it attains personality.

    Don't sell short what that can be worth.

    cheers as well for your pleasant demeanor. Sorry if I got out of line, just wanted you to be sure.
    Hi again, just curious how you are familiar with the train line? do you know how often a day it runs? or the schedule?
    23 ave used to connect with the highway. Thats where the traincrossing was. Some real long trains there as well. For a couple decades before Henday I used that as my main route to get out of town or to many areas of the city or Sh Pk. I would take that route approx 20times/week. Also I'd take it on my bicycle as I'd hit the highway cycling. So very familiar. We can also hear the train occasionally from the other side of 34st which is something you probably don't want to hear me say.

    Can't say how often the line is used but on average several times/day anyway and I KNOW they are regular at night as well.

    If you're still interested in researching google up traincrashes, derailments and contamination spillage. I would never want to be right next to a major train line. Expecially in a country with this type of climate and where the rail systems isn't fantastically serviced. Out of curiosity I looked at a lot of the lots in Tamarack. If theres a train derailment anywhere in that area you're talking cars buckling right into peoples backyards.

    Theres a reason at a train crossing you're supposed to stop further away. Personally I don't get within 30feet of a moving train. I've seen derailments and how fast they occur. They take out anything that happens to be in the way. You should never approach closer than a traincar length away.
    Last edited by Replacement; 08-12-2012 at 03:54 PM.
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  11. #111
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    Growing up in Crawford Plains from 1985 - 1994 (when I moved out from my parents at age 20) one of my favorite night time memories was hearing the faint train horn as I was falling asleep. I always assumed it was sounding the horn for the 23rd ave crossing as Replacement said earlier. I`ve been back at Crawford Plains for the last 5 years and the other night heard the train whistle for the first time in ages and the first thing I thought of "glad I don`t live in Tamarack".

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well
    The train line will not be discontinued. The highways will get a lot busier. The train line will get busier.

    If you are purchasing property - I suggest considering these three factors: location, location, location.

    I know it's sometimes hard to look beyond laminate flooring, laminate-granite countertops, and an ensuite bathroom, but there is plenty of good real estate in this city. And cheap too.

    In 5, 10, 15 years, your home will be outdated and in a horrible location. Strike one, strike two. And developers will be building cheaper housing even further out in more desirable newer neighborhoods, strike three.

    So there it is. My advice? Think about other options.
    Last edited by e909; 09-12-2012 at 08:37 PM.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by UpAllNight View Post
    This is the 21st century, we've sent rovers to mars. But the safety measures used on trains is a whistle, the same whistle that was used 100 years ago.

    CN makes profits in excess of $500 million a quarter.

    They killed 3 people this week with their trains. Maybe they can spend some money on upgrading the technology used in the trains so that they can stop?

    Or, if it's going to save a few lives, take a few thousand out of your $500 million quarterly profits and pay for a spotter to drive ahead of the train in populated areas.

    Blowing a whistle is a joke. But hey, it sure is cost effective.
    this has to be the dumbest thing I've read in a long time. Trains have been around for centuries and you suddenly think that something has worked so well for so long should be changed to make it more convenient for you? Give your head a shake.

  14. #114
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    Magical-insta-stop-on-a-dime-brakes! Right? Is that what he meant?

  15. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by e909 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    you know you're right,.. i asked for other opinions and as a new buyer just trying to get some feedback on the area.. no harm in trying.. i got a few negative and a few positive since then.. I have appreciated since my first post all the comments and disscussions on the area without a doubt.. if i didnt really like the house/area from the beginnning i wouldnt have had an offer on the table and cared to do the research but obviously i do.. im not disregarding anyones opinions or comments just absorbing it all and now have a general idea what to expect.. it is very peaceful and quiet down around there for the most part from what i have experienced, and the train behind me has not been a huge concern for me personally as i am a content sleeper, however not sure if the rest of my family is, have 2 small kids.., hopefuly if i decide to go through with it, we can live there happily for 10+years and maybe by the time if i do decide to sell after they are done school, the railway line will be discontinued or the area will be built up enough i can still turn a profit.. appreciate your feedback as well
    The train line will not be discontinued. The highways will get a lot busier. The train line will get busier.

    If you are purchasing property - I suggest considering these three factors: location, location, location.

    I know it's sometimes hard to look beyond laminate flooring, laminate-granite countertops, and an ensuite bathroom, but there is plenty of good real estate in this city. And cheap too.

    In 5, 10, 15 years, your home will be outdated and in a horrible location. Strike one, strike two. And developers will be building cheaper housing even further out in more desirable newer neighborhoods, strike three.

    So there it is. My advice? Think about other options.
    i respect your opinion but dont think the railway line is that bad.. this home still offers close proximity to several things, shopping, transit, rec centre, major commuting hwys, a newer school. huge back yard, well built with triple pane windows etc.. yes it may have the drawback of the train but some people dont mind that, its not a subway line like 111 st, its occasssional trains that last maybe 5 minutes...in other areas you back onto someone else or you have powerlines overhead or you get a teeny lot.. i dont think my like for this property is total ludicris.. but maybe im wrong.. i just like the place and it seems to work for me at this time, and maybe i'll kick myself upside the head in a couple years for not listening to this forum, but maybe I wont.. people are steadily buying in there so im confident the area is not going to be a total flop.. but I sincerely respect your opinion and will continue to dwell for a few more days

  16. #116
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    Cinsha, I'd recommend going door-to-door in the neighborhood and talk to people that live there currently. Just ask them their opinion of the area, and their house. I'm sure most people will give you the pros and cons of the area, I know I would.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  17. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    Cinsha, I'd recommend going door-to-door in the neighborhood and talk to people that live there currently. Just ask them their opinion of the area, and their house. I'm sure most people will give you the pros and cons of the area, I know I would.
    I have with one lady who would be my neighbor, never said where I would be living or anything but just asked her for her general feedback on the tranl line and school and her answers were nothing but positive.. ive been scouting the area looking for others opinions but with it being so cold this wknd, hardly seen a soul..

  18. #118

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    another thing ide like to add is i've been looking for quite some time.. i do have a buget of $400K, I would prefer to avoid duplex style living if i can, i like a nice size yard and after looking at new, it is hard to go back.. im also a single person with no trades under my belt so warranty is comforting, so for under $400k, hoping to get a detached new house with landscaping and fencing included, there's not many options.. 1 so far which is why im very much considering it.. just thought ide explain my position further to not encourage others to rant over just your everyday, bank is limitless, scenario, if my bank was limitless ide be over in windermere faster than a heartbeat

  19. #119

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    Why does a single person need a large house with abig yard so far away from everything? How far away do you work from here? I'm not even sure what the big appeal for new is these days, the way house are constructed these days is substandard. The point of buying new isn't the same it was 20 years ago. I'd rather something that has aged a bit so I know what I'm getting into. A new home you won't be able to tell how shoddy the work was, as nothing will have settle yet. And when your paying bargain basement prices in this economy?

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Medwards; 10-12-2012 at 07:23 AM.

  20. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Why does a single person need a large house with abig yard so far away from everything? How far away do you work from here? I'm not even sure what the big appeal for new is these days, the way house are constructed these days is substandard. The point of buying new isn't the same it was 20 years ago. I'd rather something that has aged a bit so I know what I'm getting into. A new home you won't be able to tell how shoddy the work was, as nothing will have settle yet. And when your paying bargain basement prices in this economy?

    Good luck!
    im a single person with 3 kids and my work place is 10 km's away, and new offers 10 year structural warranty
    Last edited by cinsha; 10-12-2012 at 07:26 AM.

  21. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    Cinsha, I'd recommend going door-to-door in the neighborhood and talk to people that live there currently. Just ask them their opinion of the area, and their house. I'm sure most people will give you the pros and cons of the area, I know I would.
    Thanks and im sure thats a great idea and wil try more this week , i drove through the devoleped area of Tamarack today that also back onto the railway line hoping to catch someone outside to speak with, but as I said, likely since it was soo cold, everyone was indoors, didnt see anybody..

  22. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    another thing ide like to add is i've been looking for quite some time.. i do have a buget of $400K, I would prefer to avoid duplex style living if i can, i like a nice size yard and after looking at new, it is hard to go back.. im also a single person with no trades under my belt so warranty is comforting, so for under $400k, hoping to get a detached new house with landscaping and fencing included, there's not many options.. 1 so far which is why im very much considering it.. just thought ide explain my position further to not encourage others to rant over just your everyday, bank is limitless, scenario, if my bank was limitless ide be over in windermere faster than a heartbeat
    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    [

    im a single person with 3 kids and my work place is 10 km's away, and new offers 10 year structural warranty
    Where to start? Medwards already said some of it. That with a house say 20 years old you already can see and note what problems there has or hasn't been. Doesn't take a tradesperson to learn to inspect a house either. Hit the library and get acquainted with home inspection. Or research it online.

    You're describing yourself as not the home handyman type. Your absolute no brainer play is getting an established house with everything completed. Deck, fence, garage, basement all done. The wonder of this is as a resale these perks rarely get fair value. Our house was all done when we walked in. Only 8 yrs old, but everything done. For around 5K more I had a garage, paved driveway, completed basement, finished two level deck, complete fencing that was already completed. THIS is the type of house you should want to buy into.

    Just under 400K should get you into most houses in Edmonton right now. Its a laugh that you're considering this specific development, which would offer brutal resale value, just to save a bit of money and buy a whole lot of headache.
    That house warranty won't be worth **** when your foundation is cracked, basement leaking, and you need your whole sinking house mudjacked a decade from now. Which could be the least of your problems.

    I'm amazed as well you want your 3 kids living so close to a train crossing.
    Last edited by Replacement; 10-12-2012 at 09:35 AM.
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  23. #123
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    I'm amazed as well you want your 3 kids living so close to a train crossing.
    Perhaps they're teenagers and unlike most kids these days, not bubblewrapped

  24. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    I'm amazed as well you want your 3 kids living so close to a train crossing.
    Perhaps they're teenagers and unlike most kids these days, not bubblewrapped
    heh

    I've watched and read too many Stephen King stories to want kids anywhere near the traintracks..

    Plus I remember the kind of **** we got up to as kids way back when..Growing up in the 60's was anything but bubblewrapped. Free licence to do whatever you wanted allday anyday as long as you somehow made it back home at somepoint.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  25. #125

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    i just got an email back from CN Rail and it wasnt good news but likely the turning point for me.. they said presently there is 6 trains per day that run anytime within a 24 hr period and likely increasing.. I did start defending the area a bit recently just because I did want the place and wanted to express the positives however alot of you have made some very good points on the negatives and that email from CN today just confirmed it all. Thank you soo much to the original poster of this forum and to all that took the time to advise also, guess i'll be starting my home search over...

  26. #126

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    Oh man!.. I just typed some more advice for you.

    Good decision.

    After selling the train line property in Tamarack..This is what we bought in Nov 2011 (I'd say we got a very good deal):

    Price: few 1000 over 400K
    Lot: only about 600 sqft less than the tamarack house... flat and sans train line
    House: detached about 800 more than the Tamarack property (2100+ sqft)
    Inclusions: Hardwood floors, granite counters even in the laundry, full landscaping on all sides, a non shaking house location/structure and pretty much anything you can think of. Only thing that was missing was the fences.
    Location: South East

    Like other people have said.. Edmonton is currently full of good property bargains. We couldnt be happier.

    New Advice: Get a realtor even if you are buying a new house.

    (BTW this is Ceeb's husband)

  27. #127
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    Good for you, and I'd be taking Replacement's advice in post #122. Good luck.
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  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    another thing ide like to add is i've been looking for quite some time.. i do have a buget of $400K, I would prefer to avoid duplex style living if i can, i like a nice size yard and after looking at new, it is hard to go back.. im also a single person with no trades under my belt so warranty is comforting, so for under $400k, hoping to get a detached new house with landscaping and fencing included, there's not many options.. 1 so far which is why im very much considering it.. just thought ide explain my position further to not encourage others to rant over just your everyday, bank is limitless, scenario, if my bank was limitless ide be over in windermere faster than a heartbeat
    look in an older neighbourhood. You want a big backyard? Older neighbourhoods like the ones in Beverly offer very large back yards.

  29. #129

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    i just got an email back from CN Rail and it wasnt good news but likely the turning point for me.. they said presently there is 6 trains per day that run anytime within a 24 hr period and likely increasing.. I did start defending the area a bit recently just because I did want the place and wanted to express the positives however alot of you have made some very good points on the negatives and that email from CN today just confirmed it all. Thank you soo much to the original poster of this forum and to all that took the time to advise also, guess i'll be starting my home search over...
    Good stuff. You dodged a bullet.

    This may seem like a negative for you and a step back but its likely to yield better results.

    No word of a lie we probably looked at 30houses and went through a few real estate agents before buying. The agent that pushed us in a different direction and setting the bar higher ended up getting the sale. All the other houses we had seen were not as appealing.

    I imagine you're already using realtor.ca and checking individual realtors online offerings in areas you're interested in?

    Don't discount other areas either. When we bought there weren't many mature neighborhoods with much for sale. Due to aging demographics and if you keep your eye open you can find some gems in mature, and very enjoyable neighborhoods. I'm not an agent btw. Not making a specific recommendation, but even look at something like this as an example:

    http://www.realtor.ca/propertyDetail...Key=-821655485


    A lot of older houses *if* in good condition offer very good value and may last longer then some of the newer houses with a warranty. Disclaimer of course that I'm not making any specific claims about the condition of this house but consider things like walkability, what the schools will be like, how you will like the area, recreation pursuits etc. Blocks away from Millcreek Ravine would be appealing. Bonnie Doon is anice area. Close to everything.

    Heres another nice area:

    http://www.realtor.ca/propertyDetail...Key=-798439128
    Last edited by Replacement; 10-12-2012 at 05:45 PM.
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    I think building a new house requires a ton of supervision by the homeowner, but many only drop by a few times to see how things are going. My mom and her husband dropped by their house nearly every day, and they caught a number of issues before it was too late (sound insulation going in the basement walls, for example). People trust that the builder knows what they're doing, and that's not always the case.

    As others have said, this will most likely be a positive thing for you. You could have the perfect, hassle-free house in that area, but if everyone around you is having problems then your house will be painted with the same brush when it comes time to sell it. You also mentioned not seeing anyone walking around the area to talk to - that's a problem in the new areas. No one walks because there isn't anything to walk to. Everyone hops inside the car in their attached garage and drives to wherever they're going.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  31. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimandjf View Post
    I am surprised this link still exisits...

    This post is to all doing their homework, as my husband and I did. You most likely stumbled on this link, just as we had.

    We made an educated decision to live in Tamarack. We googled, binged, yahooed...with searched numerous search engines from comments on the neighbourhood. We also canvased the neighbourhood where we were looking at purchasing, we asked about the builder, the neighbourhood...and obviously, the train.

    Fact is folks, when you drive to the neighbourhood coming from the anthony henday, you drive over top of the train tracks. You can see it exists from 17st.

    Reality is, any new neighbourhood you look at now (other than greisbach) has train tracks, power lines, or the anthony henday OR you are ridiculously far from the city. There is going to be something around the neighbourhood.

    My family and I consider ourselves extremely lucky to live in Tamarack. Although we loath the idea of more development in the area, we are excited to live here for years to come! (I promise you, this is such a tranquil area to live in when the contruction goes home! The openness, the wildlife, everything - it is amazing!)

    Tamarack IS an amazing place to live. The city is at your fingertips! WEM is only 15 minutes away (less once the whitemud construction is done!) 20 minutes will get you anywhere you want to go in the city! The residents are beyond friendly, the school is close, shopping is close... It is just an amazing place to live.

    The trains...the trains are the least of my worries living here. You here it every now and then, but just as much as you would anywhere else! The worst part of Tamarack is that it has to keep growing...and I know it will...it is just to great of a place to live!

    If you take anything from this thread, let it be to do your research. Do as we did, search the crap out of the neighbourhood you plan to move in, canvas the neighbourhood, not just the block you would like to live on, but the neighbourhood. Hang out there for a day, have a picnic, exist as a resident there...and then make your decision. If you don't do your research, then you don't have the right to complain afterwards...especially over something like a train track.

    Good luck...
    well im still here, havent found anything comparable, new house, close proximity to almost everything, big back yard and affordable.. i have canvassed the neighborhood and builder and besides this forum have gotten pretty good feed back.. am reconsidering purchasing this home again. I have heard when people are happy they dont start up a forum or rant about things and I believe that to be pretty true because I am like that myself. I spoke with 5 different random families backing onto the tamarack/maple crest train line and all said they dont even notice the train.. one person said, if you like the house, dont let the train deter your decision, another said they love having the big backyard for their children and the neighborhood is safe and friendly and train noise is minimal, another said you get a slight vibration if its a heavy train but you get used to it and it doesnt wake them up at night, another said trains were now supposed to have a no whistle policy going through this subdivision which was great unless the odd time there is wildlife on it.. im happy you posted some positive feedback and I had read it before but was more concentrated on the negative.. my mind isnt for sure but just wanted to comment on your positive and still understand the negatives but just weighing it out and happy this forum is present and was able to read through it all

  32. #132

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    What's your obsession with new? Especially in this day and age, where things are slapped together mostly with an inexperienced crew..

    There is lots out there if you just get over your obsession to have a brand new. You'll find much higher quality workmanship in stuff 20 years ago or more, and you'll also be able to tell if the place and foundation was built and set properly. With brand new, it's a crap shoot, and you won't know if you have a solid place or not for at least 10-15 years... You know just after you new home warranty coverage ends.
    Last edited by Medwards; 29-12-2012 at 09:02 AM.

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    There is lots out there if you just get over your obsession to have a brand new.
    You could say the same thing to all the folks on this site who obsess about brand new condo buildings going up. There are plenty of pre-owned options out there, an a lot of it is better built.

    But some people just want brand spanking new.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    What's your obsession with new? Especially in this day and age, where things are slapped together mostly with an inexperienced crew..

    There is lots out there if you just get over your obsession to have a brand new. You'll find much higher quality workmanship in stuff 20 years ago or more, and you'll also be able to tell if the place and foundation was built and set properly. With brand new, it's a crap shoot, and you won't know if you have a solid place or not for at least 10-15 years... You know just after you new home warranty coverage ends.
    with all due respect sometimes your preconceptions overlook reality. in the last couple of decades of "spec home" construction we have increased insulation levels, better quality windows with triple glazing now common, high efficiency furnaces and hot water tanks, low water consumption fixtures, etc. etc. there is no indication that an older home is a better home by virtue of its age alone and there is a potentially higher risk of things being "covered" that have no warranty from either the builder or the manufacturer of those new energuide appliances common in a new house. you won't find aluminum wiring in new houses today. and yes, you can do your home inspections and negotiate those risks into the price but to categorically assume there is no value in buying new just because it's new is just wrong.
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    ^ While I don't agree that building new homes is a bad thing, and certainly there are many fine new high quality homes built, there are some aspects to some new homes that mimic our "throw away" society. I only have to look as far as the cardboard return air ducting in some new houses to know that it some ways, older homes are better constructed than new ones.

    I've also have friends who have dropped $500k on a brand new house, only to find that the foundation started cracking right away, walls were not square and pony walls were just toe-nailed into the floor, so the first time the kids ran into it on their big wheels, the wall tilted over.

    The "new home disadvantage" in boomtowns such as ours may be a bit of a stereotype, but it's hardly just a myth either
    Last edited by 240GLT; 29-12-2012 at 11:12 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    ^ While I don't agree that building new homes is a bad thing, and certainly there are many fine new high quality homes built, there are some aspects to some new homes that mimic our "throw away" society. I only have to look as far as the cardboard return air ducting in some new houses to know that it some ways, older homes are better constructed than new ones.

    I've also have friends who have dropped $500k on a brand new house, only to find that the foundation started cracking right away, walls were not square and pony walls were just toe-nailed into the floor, so the first time the kids ran into it on their big wheels, the wall tilted over.

    The "new home disadvantage" in boomtowns such as ours may be a bit of a stereotype, but it's hardly just a myth either
    no argument other than those things are as likely to be the case in any home that might have been "new" in the last decade or so, not just those that would be "new" today. my point is that quality is a function of just that - quality - and not a function of age alone.

    ps. our own home is coming up on 10 years old. getting trades that would even read a set of plans even if they could read them was like pulling teeth. anyone that could breath could get hired in a heartbeat and anyone with more skill than that could be headhunted off a job just as quickly. it certainly wasn't a climate conducive to tradesmanship and quality regardless of the market segment.
    Last edited by kcantor; 29-12-2012 at 11:39 AM. Reason: typo/added ps
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  37. #137

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    When you are buying a discount new home in a discount new area, expect the worst. You get what you pay for.
    Sure, some new houses are built properly like kcantor has gone on about, but you don't find those in the bargain basement bin called tamarack

  38. #138

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    Just on a dynamic basis considering skilled labor I'd rather buy a house constructed in a normal, or tighter economy where the skilled tradesmen were the ones building homes vs those constructed in a boom economy where you can't find decent labor and where guys can just walk off the jobsite for greener pastures anytime.

    Also, and I raised this point earlier is that having a property that is completely built out with garage, landscaping, fence, deck, basement completed is far better value than a newhouse with only some of the above.
    On resale prices you usually get better value on the built out properties because this development work for some reason rarely gets resale value on the dollar spent.
    In the case of Cinsha particularly she wanted a house with less labor involved so a built out resale makes more sense.

    The point that can't be repeated enough is that on a mature property you can tell a lot of the problems that have or haven't occurred. In a new property you can't evaluate many of the potential impending problems. I will say when I see how basements are build in recently flooded areas and very wet conditions I wonder how much the footings and basements will stand the test of time. I wouldn't even wonder that in areas next to functioning freight train tracks. As a rule In Tamarack I would infer basements and footings that will be very subject to problems.
    Last edited by Replacement; 29-12-2012 at 11:57 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    When you are buying a discount new home in a discount new area, expect the worst. You get what you pay for.
    Sure, some new houses are built properly like kcantor has gone on about, but you don't find those in the bargain basement bin called tamarack
    the new home model in tamarack will be virtually identical to the same new home model in spruce grove or windermere or sherwood park or fort saskatchewan and will be built with the same suppliers of everything from roof trusses to windows to appliances and the same manufacturers of furnaces and appliances and the same trades from cribbers to roofers to plumbers. if you think there is one set of "regular" suppliers and trades and a second set of "discount" suppliers and trades you don't understand the economics of the industry.
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  40. #140

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinsha View Post
    well im still here, havent found anything comparable, new house, close proximity to almost everything, big back yard and affordable.. i have canvassed the neighborhood and builder and besides this forum have gotten pretty good feed back.. am reconsidering purchasing this home again. I have heard when people are happy they dont start up a forum or rant about things and I believe that to be pretty true because I am like that myself. I spoke with 5 different random families backing onto the tamarack/maple crest train line and all said they dont even notice the train.. one person said, if you like the house, dont let the train deter your decision, another said they love having the big backyard for their children and the neighborhood is safe and friendly and train noise is minimal, another said you get a slight vibration if its a heavy train but you get used to it and it doesnt wake them up at night, another said trains were now supposed to have a no whistle policy going through this subdivision which was great unless the odd time there is wildlife on it.. im happy you posted some positive feedback and I had read it before but was more concentrated on the negative.. my mind isnt for sure but just wanted to comment on your positive and still understand the negatives but just weighing it out and happy this forum is present and was able to read through it all
    In essence you canvassed a cross section of people that jumped over the same housing cliff and are willing to do anything to reduce cognitive dissonance about the single most important purchase of their lives. Of course you're going to get a lot of denial, minimizing of all problems, and people stating what they did. This is a selective subgroup of people that ignored, and want to continue to ignore the obvious concerns. Which says nothing about the market which would for the most part have nothing to do with such properties.
    Guess what, the sticker price is low because the demand for this nature of location is very low. Again getting what you pay for. If you ever plan to sell this won't be attractive in anyway to prospective buyers.

    Finally, as I've mentioned none of the people you talked to have been there long enough to know anything of the foundation and basement and structural problems that they are very likely to experience in the future.

    This is an areas smack dab next to freight train tracks sitting on former marshland. Good luck.
    Last edited by Replacement; 29-12-2012 at 12:02 PM.
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  41. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    When you are buying a discount new home in a discount new area, expect the worst. You get what you pay for.
    Sure, some new houses are built properly like kcantor has gone on about, but you don't find those in the bargain basement bin called tamarack
    the new home model in tamarack will be virtually identical to the same new home model in spruce grove or windermere or sherwood park or fort saskatchewan and will be built with the same suppliers of everything from roof trusses to windows to appliances and the same manufacturers of furnaces and appliances and the same trades from cribbers to roofers to plumbers. if you think there is one set of "regular" suppliers and trades and a second set of "discount" suppliers and trades you don't understand the economics of the industry.
    This is the single worst location I can think of to buy property. I believe that Medwards was referring to the Tamarack location. Theres very clear reasons why lot pricing would be cheaper in this specific development.
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  42. #142

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    So what kcantor is saying that all houses are constructed equally...

    That might be the biggest bs I've heard in 2012. Congrats!

    Discountville leads to corners being cut to try to turn a profit. Not all home builders build crap, but when your trying to make a dime, and the price is already in the basement due to location, you turn to cutting corners. Hiring inexperienced labour, using cheaper materials.

    No a house in tamarack is not the same as a house in Windermere.
    Last edited by Medwards; 29-12-2012 at 12:34 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    So what kcantor is saying that all houses are constructed equally...

    That might be the biggest bs I've heard in 2012. Congrats!

    Discountville leads to corners being cut to try to turn a profit. Not all home builders build crap, but when your trying to make a dime, and the price is already in the basement due to location, you turn to cutting corners. Hiring inexperienced labour, using cheaper materials.

    No a house in tamarack is not the same as a house in Windermere.
    read what i wrote Medwards... i didn't say all houses in tamarack are the same as all houses in windermere. i said that the same model from the same builder in tamarack would be the same house as it would be in windermere. just like the corolla you buy in wetaskiwin is the same car you would get if you bought it in st. albert or edmonton. not the same as an avalon bought in st. albert or edmonton but the same corolla.
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  44. #144

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    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.
    ??? not all older homes are/were built by the same builder either. i don't follow your point...
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  46. #146

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    I love this forum and find that the majority of people are always helpful when I have questions.
    My message to the poster looking to build there, take the pros and cons from what everyone says on here, but in the end, it will be your home, not mine or any of the other posters on here.

    I know I'm guilty of this, but as long as you're not buying a money pit that will cause you to constantly to put money into it to fix, we shouldn't just look at a home as an investment. It's your own sanctuary and where you will create new memories. As long as you are happy there, then that's the most important thing. Whether it's a an older home or a newly built home, just make sure it's a place you will be happy to be in for years.

  47. #147

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.
    ??? not all older homes are/were built by the same builder either. i don't follow your point...
    My point is simple. Buying a new home is a crap shoot. Buying an older home, the telltale signs of shoddy workmanship are much easier to find. You have a better idea of what you are getting into. Why people are obsessed with living in the newest areas or brand new condos baffles me.

  48. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    What's your obsession with new? Especially in this day and age, where things are slapped together mostly with an inexperienced crew..

    There is lots out there if you just get over your obsession to have a brand new. You'll find much higher quality workmanship in stuff 20 years ago or more, and you'll also be able to tell if the place and foundation was built and set properly. With brand new, it's a crap shoot, and you won't know if you have a solid place or not for at least 10-15 years... You know just after you new home warranty coverage ends.
    just curious what is your obsession with disliking Tamarack? why do you call it a baragin basement bin?

  49. #149

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    I'm pretty sure you've read my other posts on this thread...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.
    ??? not all older homes are/were built by the same builder either. i don't follow your point...
    My point is simple. Buying a new home is a crap shoot. Buying an older home, the telltale signs of shoddy workmanship are much easier to find. You have a better idea of what you are getting into. Why people are obsessed with living in the newest areas or brand new condos baffles me.
    sorry Medwards but other people's choices don't qualify as obsessions simply because you happen to disagree with them... they may not be your choices or your preferences but that does not invalidate them, your being baffled notwithstanding.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  51. #151

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    a few of them, but can you refresh my memory, do you have experience living in this area? or know someone who has? from what I can tell there is a marshland beside the whitemud but where the homes are being built, looks like it was regular farmland and forest prior to this development and by google map photos. Ive also read the soil was tested and passed for residential building permits and recall further tests for vibration or something similar was also done and passed to allow the permits. Ive read a few people say it is built "on" marshland but am not sure if that is accurate and if it is, forgive me as I am not certain just trying to find things out as best I can. I do think its a little dramatic in my opinion to call this area a bargain basement bin like its skid row or something.. but understand, we're all here to speak our comments and opinions

  52. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.
    ??? not all older homes are/were built by the same builder either. i don't follow your point...
    My point is simple. Buying a new home is a crap shoot. Buying an older home, the telltale signs of shoddy workmanship are much easier to find. You have a better idea of what you are getting into. Why people are obsessed with living in the newest areas or brand new condos baffles me.
    sorry Medwards but other people's choices don't qualify as obsessions simply because you happen to disagree with them... they may not be your choices or your preferences but that does not invalidate them, your being baffled notwithstanding.
    I'm sorry, I thought this was a place where we have debates and offer our opinions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    I get that tamarack common may be the same as ambleside south. But they are not the only builders in the area.
    ??? not all older homes are/were built by the same builder either. i don't follow your point...
    My point is simple. Buying a new home is a crap shoot. Buying an older home, the telltale signs of shoddy workmanship are much easier to find. You have a better idea of what you are getting into. Why people are obsessed with living in the newest areas or brand new condos baffles me.
    sorry Medwards but other people's choices don't qualify as obsessions simply because you happen to disagree with them... they may not be your choices or your preferences but that does not invalidate them, your being baffled notwithstanding.
    I'm sorry, I thought this was a place where we have debates and offer our opinions.
    having debates and offering opinions is not mutually exclusive with respecting those you chose to debate with (and debating is not the same as arguing) not is it mutually exclusive with respecting the opinions of others as being as valid as your own.
    Last edited by kcantor; 29-12-2012 at 06:54 PM.
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  54. #154

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    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this , i have made up my mind not to buy house in tamarack , the house i was looking was on 11 street , but the agent did not tell us this ,and now i will not buy here, thnx guys .

  55. #155

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    Quote Originally Posted by cool9city View Post
    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this , i have made up my mind not to buy house in tamarack , the house i was looking was on 11 street , but the agent did not tell us this ,and now i will not buy here, thnx guys .
    I can't believe the trolls in this thread spending their days to convince someone (Cinsha) to not purchase a house in tamarack. Some have gone on to argue via multiple posts even tho the person said they really liked the house. If you love the house then buy it!

    There is a lot of misinformation in this thread. The line isnt the main line to calgary like the one person said... it runs out to camrose. People's houses aren't rattling and the train is barely noticeable if you actually do live in the area. Why everyone is saying tamarack is bad is beyond crazy(Although if the line wasn't disclosed 5 yrs ago thats no good). In Tamarack you have a school thats walking distance for so many people, transit, new rec center all the shopping you need. If your house isn't backing onto the train track then you won't even know the train is going by.

    When you ask for the negative in anything it is easy to find and easy to find something better. There may be something better around the corner in every aspect of your life but is that how you want to live? In all parts of the city there is simple white noise we all have to deal with. Busy streets, honking horns, loud buses driving by, cement trucks roaring by your house...

    Maybe we should start a thread to tell people not to move downtown because of all the noise? Oh wait thats right there are lots of advantages to living downtown.. as in any area including Tamarack.

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    Growing up in Ottawa (Nepean actually), both of the houses we lived in backed right on to the tracks. One was probably 100' to the tracks, the other 150'. They were loud and the house vibrated when they drove by, but you got used to it. My mom used to keep us busy by counting the number of cars. Or someone would yell out 'grain train!!' when the loaded grain cars from out west would show up. It would be good fun leaning over the fence and making the signal to get the conductor to pull the whistle.
    And this was right in the middle of town.

  57. #157

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cool9city View Post
    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this , i have made up my mind not to buy house in tamarack , the house i was looking was on 11 street , but the agent did not tell us this ,and now i will not buy here, thnx guys .
    I can't believe the trolls in this thread spending their days to convince someone (Cinsha) to not purchase a house in tamarack. Some have gone on to argue via multiple posts even tho the person said they really liked the house. If you love the house then buy it!

    There is a lot of misinformation in this thread. The line isnt the main line to calgary like the one person said... it runs out to camrose. People's houses aren't rattling and the train is barely noticeable if you actually do live in the area. Why everyone is saying tamarack is bad is beyond crazy(Although if the line wasn't disclosed 5 yrs ago thats no good). In Tamarack you have a school thats walking distance for so many people, transit, new rec center all the shopping you need. If your house isn't backing onto the train track then you won't even know the train is going by.

    When you ask for the negative in anything it is easy to find and easy to find something better. There may be something better around the corner in every aspect of your life but is that how you want to live? In all parts of the city there is simple white noise we all have to deal with. Busy streets, honking horns, loud buses driving by, cement trucks roaring by your house...

    Maybe we should start a thread to tell people not to move downtown because of all the noise? Oh wait thats right there are lots of advantages to living downtown.. as in any area including Tamarack.
    You could start that thread. No one is stopping you. In fact, I'm sure there's already a bunch of threads about downtown issues.

    My question is, why does it bother you?
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    I think the main worry is the quality of construction of the houses. When I first lived in Slave Lake I lived in an apartment building not more than 50m from the tracks, albeit facing away from them. You would get used to the noise and the whistle but would still feel the shaking.

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    Here's a thought. What about a derailment? A subdivision next to a rail line in this day and age is folly at best. The first accident will have those who bought there ready to sue for thier own misinformed decision. Time will tell.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBear View Post
    I think the main worry is the quality of construction of the houses. When I first lived in Slave Lake I lived in an apartment building not more than 50m from the tracks, albeit facing away from them. You would get used to the noise and the whistle but would still feel the shaking.
    Again though, the "quality of construction" is going to be similar, if not the same, as any tract housing project, whether it be in Tamarack, Terwillegar or anywhere else.

    The features and ammenities may differ but the "qaulity" will be on par with any other development

    We go down to the PetSmart at Whitemud and 17th st once a month or so, as they have the best groomers we have found in Edmonton yet (that can deal with clipping our little Chihuahua's nails) THe neighborhood looks almost exactly the same as any other tract housing subdivision in the city.

    And people have lived alongside railroads forever. Noise bothers some people. Others get used to it.
    Last edited by 240GLT; 06-03-2013 at 01:55 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnr67 View Post
    Here's a thought. What about a derailment? A subdivision next to a rail line in this day and age is folly at best. The first accident will have those who bought there ready to sue for thier own misinformed decision. Time will tell.
    It comes down to probability of derailment, which is very low to pose a threat to residents.

  62. #162

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cool9city View Post
    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this , i have made up my mind not to buy house in tamarack , the house i was looking was on 11 street , but the agent did not tell us this ,and now i will not buy here, thnx guys .
    I can't believe the trolls in this thread spending their days to convince someone (Cinsha) to not purchase a house in tamarack. Some have gone on to argue via multiple posts even tho the person said they really liked the house. If you love the house then buy it!

    There is a lot of misinformation in this thread. The line isnt the main line to calgary like the one person said... it runs out to camrose. People's houses aren't rattling and the train is barely noticeable if you actually do live in the area. Why everyone is saying tamarack is bad is beyond crazy(Although if the line wasn't disclosed 5 yrs ago thats no good). In Tamarack you have a school thats walking distance for so many people, transit, new rec center all the shopping you need. If your house isn't backing onto the train track then you won't even know the train is going by.

    When you ask for the negative in anything it is easy to find and easy to find something better. There may be something better around the corner in every aspect of your life but is that how you want to live? In all parts of the city there is simple white noise we all have to deal with. Busy streets, honking horns, loud buses driving by, cement trucks roaring by your house...

    Maybe we should start a thread to tell people not to move downtown because of all the noise? Oh wait thats right there are lots of advantages to living downtown.. as in any area including Tamarack.
    What an odd post. person opens an account so they can make this observation and calling everybody trolls. Suggests a vested interest.
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    ^No kidding. And this person needs to get their facts straight. Like the claim that this is not the CN main line to Calgary when it is. The CN main line goes to Calgary via Camrose. The line that follows the Highway 2A corridor is the CP line.

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    [QUOTE=Replacement;507373]
    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cool9city View Post
    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this...Maybe we should start a thread to tell people not to move downtown because of all the noise? Oh wait thats right there are lots of advantages to living downtown.. as in any area including Tamarack.
    What an odd post. person opens an account so they can make this observation and calling everybody trolls. Suggests a vested interest.
    Or maybe someone who lives there who doesn't appreciate a bunch of people who don't live there slagging their neighbourhood. My girlfriend bought there and she likes it. Two of her friends bought there as well. I love my girlfriends house!

    The poster makes a good point re: noise in other areas (downtown). Hardly unique to Tamarack.

    I see a lot of first home buyers, especially young families and I've met a lot of first-generation immigrants there. It's so new, and still being developed, but it has the makings of a nice community.

    I'd recommend it from what I've seen and heard.
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    ^It also has a new school, which is a huge draw for most.

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    ^^Worth remembering this thread was started by someone who had bought a house in Tamarack near the rail line and was unhappy with the developer for making a false claim to prospective buyers that the rail line would be shutting down.

    My bigger concern is with the nearby Maple Crest neighbourhood which is shoe-horned between a busy CN main line, the Whitemud and AHD. Yet how is this neighbourhood being marketed by the developer and home builders:

    "Maple Crest is a natural sanctuary of towering woodlands, pristine lakes and quiet park land. Itís a tranquil place, ideal for active families wanting to enjoy a safe, healthy lifestyle. Perfectly nestled in south Edmonton, just east of Tamarack community, this neighbourhood is close to shopping, transit, and recreation areas located just minutes from home." Link: http://www.lincolnberg.com/showhome/...ex/Maple-Crest

    Buyer beware I suppose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cool9city View Post
    hi, thanks to this thread, and after reading all this...Maybe we should start a thread to tell people not to move downtown because of all the noise? Oh wait thats right there are lots of advantages to living downtown.. as in any area including Tamarack.
    What an odd post. person opens an account so they can make this observation and calling everybody trolls. Suggests a vested interest.
    Or maybe someone who lives there who doesn't appreciate a bunch of people who don't live there slagging their neighbourhood. My girlfriend bought there and she likes it. Two of her friends bought there as well. I love my girlfriends house!

    The poster makes a good point re: noise in other areas (downtown). Hardly unique to Tamarack.

    I see a lot of first home buyers, especially young families and I've met a lot of first-generation immigrants there. It's so new, and still being developed, but it has the makings of a nice community.

    I'd recommend it from what I've seen and heard.
    The purpose of the comments in the thread are not to "slag" a neighborhood. Moreso they are filled with caveats and buyer beware information to dissuade people from what would be their ill advised purchase. Clearly you haven't taken the time to peruse the multitude of reasons given NOT to purchase a home in this subdivision.
    That said theres no reason for you to "slag" the comments of others that only have the best intentions at heart.
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    Unless there's issues beyond being next to the CNR line, like inadequate infrastructure, poor construction, drainage and ground water problems, there's no reason to tell people not to buy a house there. Since trains are infrequent compared to heavy traffic, the amount of noise would be minimal. If rail lines are a major concern, then there's lots of properties that shouldn't have been built close to the CN main line or Dunvegan or Fort Saskatchewan lines.

    As for Maple Crest, it is located next to the Fulton Creek Environmental Reserve and the distances to Whitemud and AHD are far enough to have no impact. Again, it would only be the rail line that might be an issue.
    Last edited by TerryH; 17-03-2013 at 12:20 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TerryH View Post
    Unless there's issues beyond being next to the CNR line, like inadequate infrastructure, poor construction, drainage and ground water problems, there's no reason to tell people not to buy a house there. Since trains are infrequent compared to heavy traffic, the amount of noise would be minimal. If rail lines are a major concern, then there's lots of properties that shouldn't have been built close to the CN main line or Dunvegan or Fort Saskatchewan lines.

    As for Maple Crest, it is located next to the Fulton Creek Environmental Reserve and the distances to Whitemud and AHD are far enough to have no impact. Again, it would only be the rail line that might be an issue.
    The maple crest subdivision is built on former wetlands/marsh habitat, bodies of water can still be seen north or south of the subdivision, this being built next to train tracks. I've visited some of the showhomes in the area for a laugh, being that the basements were poured so close to freight train tracks the concrete never had a chance to settle properly.

    Combine this with the ill advised practice of pumping water out of basement excavations one day and framing and pouring concrete soon after and the foundations and basements of these structures are wrought with problems. Adequate time should be given to dry out an excavation before pouring concrete. Pouring concrete in very moist surroundings impacts the quality of the curing of the concrete. Obviously vibration from freight trains does as well. Pouring basements and foundations in winter adds the perfect trifecta. Vibration, excess water, and cold temp are the three worst things you can do to curing concrete.

    I've seen numerous severe, long cracks in basements in some showhomes. This obviously being soon after the houses were built. You can also tell that cracks are continuing to grow and spread as attempts were made to seal cracks but with newer cracks unsealed. I suspect its an ongoing battle only likely getting far worse.
    Last edited by Replacement; 17-03-2013 at 01:41 PM.
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    Apart from the rail line there have been no other complaints. There's nothing online that I can see for complaints other than this thread. Even the OP didn't mention anything else and he has moved on to other things with his blog. One has to remember that much of Mill Woods was swampy and that the water table can be rather high. Again, no reason to tell people not to buy there.

  71. #171

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    Quote Originally Posted by TerryH View Post
    Apart from the rail line there have been no other complaints. There's nothing online that I can see for complaints other than this thread. Even the OP didn't mention anything else and he has moved on to other things with his blog. One has to remember that much of Mill Woods was swampy and that the water table can be rather high. Again, no reason to tell people not to buy there.
    What would you expect? Any concern expressed with the poor quality of foundations and basements is down played if not dismissed. With the consumer being told long cracks the width of a basement are of no concern and that you know nothing about concrete and thats what concrete does, it cracks.. Anybody that does complain is told that cracks in basements and foundations is now the new "normal" and that you see this with all poured basements which is an out and out lie.

    More the case this is the end result of a steady deterioration in trades, standards, supervision, inspection and application in home construction.

    Suddenly you see basements poured in 30 below weather, in pouring rain, in excavations not even properly pumped out, on non properly compacted clay, and basement pours that are as little as two inches thick in some places. Which is bad enough. But add intermittent vibration from freight train tracks too closeby and improper curing and its a recipe for trouble.

    Numerous long cracks in basement floors and foundations are the easiest to spot indication of decling building standards. But with excess moisture, and vibration further reducing the quality of concrete I wouldn't want to see the resultant problems in some of these Maple crest builds 10, 20, 30 yrs from now.

    Oddly the quality of foundations and basements is rapidly decling in building construction while the monumental size and weight of houses we're slapping on them is increasing. Another sure recipe for trouble.
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    Replacement, I assume you're a qualified engineer that can speak to how Maple was engineered and constructed? Hmmm, thought so. Anyways, keep up with the generalizations.

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    The best way to tell if foundations are being affected by water is to check foundations of homes in Mill Woods as many have been around for a few decades. I would imagine that flooding in those homes would be more because of poor drainage. I was surprised that water helps cure concrete as long as no excess water gets into the mix. I always thought it had to dry to set. http://sandscommercialflooring.com/p...g-concrete.pdf

    As for winter conditions, there are guidelines as how to pour when the ground is frozen and the air temperature is below freezing. As long as the concrete doesn't freeze it will set well. https://www.chbaalberta.ca/uploads/f..._Practices.pdf

    As well, are the cracks large enough to condemn a house or are they minor? I lived in a house in Blue Quill that had a minor crack that never grew. The only time there was any water seeping into the basement was after a massive dump of rain. And that amount was probably enough to get a washcloth damp.

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    I guess a question could be asked about building foundations being set if the building is adjacent to an LRT line. LRT cars passing would be of shorter duration but would be very frequent as opposed to a freight train. I remember hearing that a piece of a roof overhang broke off an old building across from Olympic Plaza in Calgary due to the frequent vibrations of the passing C-Trains. That building has since been torn down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisD View Post
    Replacement, I assume you're a qualified engineer that can speak to how Maple was engineered and constructed? Hmmm, thought so. Anyways, keep up with the generalizations.
    Well I'm uniquely familiar with trying to pour basements/foundations near freight train tracks and such buildings having problems. Are you?

    I worked in the industry while young and had relatives that worked with concrete their whole lives and in foreman capacities, so yeah, a little bit of experience in the area.

    Wasn't aware I had to be an engineer to comment on a messageboard although good to know. Maybe people should first have a dissertation thesis before commenting on most topics here.
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    When making generalizations such as you did, you best be able to back it up. But I think you have a weak hand.

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    The are some very good engineers out there and there are some very bad ones. I often trust the experienced trades people more than some green engineers. Just because someone has an engineering stamp, does not necessarily make them an expert. I have seen some engineers make major mistakes when they they were warned repeditly that they were wrong but stubbornly pushed their opinion.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
    The are some very good engineers out there and there are some very bad ones. I often trust the experienced trades people more than some green engineers. Just because someone has an engineering stamp, does not necessarily make them an expert. I have seen some engineers make major mistakes when they they were warned repeditly that they were wrong but stubbornly pushed their opinion.
    Precisely.

    One of the chief difficulties between education, research, and applied settings is that which is learned in the lab or classroom is often much different than applied real world settings.

    For instance, out of curiosity I researched my position on this. I can find and quote several research studies on impacts of vibration on concrete but ALL of them utilizing concrete cylinders as the test medium. Virtually all using the same size, diameter, of concrete cylinders as the inter reliability test medium.

    Anybody see an inherent problem with that research?

    Yes, the study of how specific concrete cylinders behave under vibration is well illustrated. This is fine I guess if all you are ever doing is pouring pilings for a deck or something..

    I understand the scientific method, and need for research studies to practice inter reliability and confirm results across several researche studies. But lost in the scientific method is catering study to wider ranging appications.

    How about other forms. How about concrete floors and foundations that are not poured to desired thickness. Or poured under adverse conditions, too cold, too wet, how about actually bringing the research study out of the lab and into the actual environment and studying how concrete behaves in housing applications?

    Theory vs application. Yeah, in many cases I'll trust the hands on experienced trades person that has been building for years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisD View Post
    When making generalizations such as you did, you best be able to back it up. But I think you have a weak hand.
    I've had experience being in a concrete crew trying to pour foundation and basements in structures too close to freight train tracks.
    I've been part of the crew that had to demolish a poorly set pour 3 times because it didn't pass inspection. Of a building that finally used 12 inch cinderblock, solid filled with concrete, with a lot more rebar, steel durawall, ties and anchors to try to hold the structure together during construction while rumbling freight trains wreaked their havoc.
    Even that last construction method I cited was unsatisfactory and had to go to the courts for payment with a judge ruling on all evidence that there was no conceivable way to build a solid foundation in that location so close to the train tracks. The construction company I was working for, and many others at the time, refused to make subsequent tenders for builds in the area. It was just way too much trouble. You couldn't estimate cost, labor, overrun, or whether you could even match specifications.

    Granted this was decades ago and theres been some changes in concrete formulations. But I wouldn't entirely discount the inherent problems with builds so close to traintracks and repeated intermittent vibration of long duration during setting and curing.

    The funnier thing is today, I would wonder whether that same concrete basement and foundation would be approved in todays construction environment where poor finished product appears to be the norm.
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    Well, we've been building communities next to railroads for well over a hundred years now and many of those buildings are still standing. And many were built under standards a lot less rigorous than we have today. I think I'll end it on that note.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisD View Post
    When making generalizations such as you did, you best be able to back it up. But I think you have a weak hand.
    I've had experience being in a concrete crew trying to pour foundation and basements in structures too close to freight train tracks.
    I've been part of the crew that had to demolish a poorly set pour 3 times because it didn't pass inspection. Of a building that finally used 12 inch cinderblock, solid filled with concrete, with a lot more rebar, steel durawall, ties and anchors to try to hold the structure together during construction while rumbling freight trains wreaked their havoc.
    Even that last construction method I cited was unsatisfactory and had to go to the courts for payment with a judge ruling on all evidence that there was no conceivable way to build a solid foundation in that location so close to the train tracks. The construction company I was working for, and many others at the time, refused to make subsequent tenders for builds in the area. It was just way too much trouble. You couldn't estimate cost, labor, overrun, or whether you could even match specifications.

    Granted this was decades ago and theres been some changes in concrete formulations. But I wouldn't entirely discount the inherent problems with builds so close to traintracks and repeated intermittent vibration of long duration during setting and curing.

    The funnier thing is today, I would wonder whether that same concrete basement and foundation would be approved in todays construction environment where poor finished product appears to be the norm.
    As ChisD noted we have been building beside train tracks - and highways and underground and elevated and at grade tracked transit systems for more than a hundred years with no issues...

    as far as vibration itself goes, i'm not sure why you think it's an issue for concrete when vibrators are often used right in the concrete to eliminate air pockets and honey combing and you'll often see experienced crews "hammering" the outside of the forms while placing around knockouts for windows etc. to try and achieve the same thing.

    the kinds if issues you're pointing out are much more likely to occur as a result of faulty workmanship or site preparation or faulty concrete mixes or the freezing or overheating of the concrete while curing than by off-site vibration.
    Last edited by kcantor; 30-03-2013 at 02:22 PM.
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    There's a big difference between using a vibrator for a couple minutes to take out airpockets and a rumbling train shaking the (perhaps not fully cured) foundations for 15 minutes at a time 2 or 3 times a day. Throw in a swamp for good measure and there could be some big issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    There's a big difference between using a vibrator for a couple minutes to take out airpockets and a rumbling train shaking the (perhaps not fully cured) foundations for 15 minutes at a time 2 or 3 times a day. Throw in a swamp for good measure and there could be some big issues.
    then explain away all of those foundations built right in the middle of active train yards over the past hundred years that have no concrete quality control issues including cn's new building at walker yards?
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    ^ I think you missed the word swamp kcantor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medwards View Post
    ^ I think you missed the word swamp kcantor.
    i didn't miss it... if there really is a swamp and it's not a problem for the railroad tracks then it shouldn't be a problem to deal with for a house. and if there is a problem with a swamp it's certainly not one of vibration. if there is indeed a swamp then that's what piles are for - which comes back to my point that it is likely workmanship and construction practices as the issue, not the railroad tracks. although come to think of it, if you're building on clay or fill material or peat - which would be pretty much anywhere in edmonton- you would be well advised to use piles and not rely on spread footings.
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    I think the thing I'd be worried about would be chemical leaks from derailed rail cars, if a derailment occurred in this area.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    There's a big difference between using a vibrator for a couple minutes to take out airpockets and a rumbling train shaking the (perhaps not fully cured) foundations for 15 minutes at a time 2 or 3 times a day. Throw in a swamp for good measure and there could be some big issues.
    Yes, thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    There's a big difference between using a vibrator for a couple minutes to take out airpockets and a rumbling train shaking the (perhaps not fully cured) foundations for 15 minutes at a time 2 or 3 times a day. Throw in a swamp for good measure and there could be some big issues.
    then explain away all of those foundations built right in the middle of active train yards over the past hundred years that have no concrete quality control issues including cn's new building at walker yards?
    If you've followed along in the thread a combination of issues would have me concerned with the subdivision in question:

    1)Deteriorating standards in construction of current basements/foundations including unacceptable tested deviations and variance in thickness of concrete.

    2)Increased practice of pouring concrete in inclement conditions, rain, excessive groundwater, non dry areas, or in colder temperatures or colder ground conditions.

    3)This subdivision being located in what was known marsh land. With visibly very little infill separating it from its original and surrounding state.

    4)Most substrata in this area is clay, subject to settling, movement, and producing shifting stress on any concrete basement, foundation.

    5)Add continuous uncontrolled vibration to this through the entire concrete curing process and this exacerbates issues already had with the above.

    6)Add continous, ongoing, longterm excessive vibration and it isn't going to help mitigate any of the problems noted above.

    but alas it is buyer beware. There are of course many other reasons not to by in this subdivision. For instance that the resale market for these properties will be poor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    If you've followed along in the thread a combination of issues would have me concerned with the subdivision in question:

    1)Deteriorating standards in construction of current basements/foundations including unacceptable tested deviations and variance in thickness of concrete.

    2)Increased practice of pouring concrete in inclement conditions, rain, excessive groundwater, non dry areas, or in colder temperatures or colder ground conditions.

    3)This subdivision being located in what was known marsh land. With visibly very little infill separating it from its original and surrounding state.

    4)Most substrata in this area is clay, subject to settling, movement, and producing shifting stress on any concrete basement, foundation.

    5)Add continuous uncontrolled vibration to this through the entire concrete curing process and this exacerbates issues already had with the above.

    6)Add continous, ongoing, longterm excessive vibration and it isn't going to help mitigate any of the problems noted above.

    but alas it is buyer beware. There are of course many other reasons not to by in this subdivision. For instance that the resale market for these properties will be poor.
    i have highlighted in bold those points you are trying to make that, whether or not that they are valid (and they may well be), have nothing to do with tamarack per se in that as much as they apply (per some of my earlier posts) they apply to most of the edmonton region.

    i have highlighted in italics those points you are trying to make that amount to nothing but conjecture on your part and where there is anecdotal evidence (per some of my earlier posts) that you are wrong.

    that leaves two things. firstly, there is your concern that what was "marsh land" was not adequately dealt with by the engineers and geotechnical consultants and the earthwork contractors and the city of edmonton throughout the design and approval and construction process. if that wasn't the case, then - again - that concern would certainly not be limited to tamarack.

    secondly is your assertion that the resale market for tamarack will be poor. on that point, i guess it's simply a question of whose crystal ball is better but in mine the same things that make tamarack an attractive community now will continue to make it an attractive community in the future while those things that are less attractive are already factored into the current pricing which means it will perform much like any other community when it comes to resale values.

    buyer beware? most certainly - but that's no different outside of tamarack than inside tamarack either is it?
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  89. #189

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    If you've followed along in the thread a combination of issues would have me concerned with the subdivision in question:

    1)Deteriorating standards in construction of current basements/foundations including unacceptable tested deviations and variance in thickness of concrete.

    2)Increased practice of pouring concrete in inclement conditions, rain, excessive groundwater, non dry areas, or in colder temperatures or colder ground conditions.

    3)This subdivision being located in what was known marsh land. With visibly very little infill separating it from its original and surrounding state.

    4)Most substrata in this area is clay, subject to settling, movement, and producing shifting stress on any concrete basement, foundation.

    5)Add continuous uncontrolled vibration to this through the entire concrete curing process and this exacerbates issues already had with the above.

    6)Add continous, ongoing, longterm excessive vibration and it isn't going to help mitigate any of the problems noted above.

    but alas it is buyer beware. There are of course many other reasons not to by in this subdivision. For instance that the resale market for these properties will be poor.
    i have highlighted in bold those points you are trying to make that, whether or not that they are valid (and they may well be), have nothing to do with tamarack per se in that as much as they apply (per some of my earlier posts) they apply to most of the edmonton region.

    i have highlighted in italics those points you are trying to make that amount to nothing but conjecture on your part and where there is anecdotal evidence (per some of my earlier posts) that you are wrong.

    that leaves two things. firstly, there is your concern that what was "marsh land" was not adequately dealt with by the engineers and geotechnical consultants and the earthwork contractors and the city of edmonton throughout the design and approval and construction process. if that wasn't the case, then - again - that concern would certainly not be limited to tamarack.

    secondly is your assertion that the resale market for tamarack will be poor. on that point, i guess it's simply a question of whose crystal ball is better but in mine the same things that make tamarack an attractive community now will continue to make it an attractive community in the future while those things that are less attractive are already factored into the current pricing which means it will perform much like any other community when it comes to resale values.

    buyer beware? most certainly - but that's no different outside of tamarack than inside tamarack either is it?
    Just to be clear my latter comments are more specific to the Maple Crest subdivision. We won't agree on this topic, nor on your assertion that the bolded points are wrong.

    I disagree that the lots or community is priced accordingly with loss in value factored in. On the contrary in this, and Tamarack very little deviation in lot pricing occurred close to, or farther from tracks.

    just as an aside, and the developer must have taken down the specific schematic map, but one of the recent adverts had a diagram of Maple Crest featuring the very convenient school nearby(and which neglected to point out that there is a main national freight line running directly between the two.) Perhaps somebody pointed out how this *convenience* was very misleading.

    Again buyer beware but with the amount of children that have been killed on traintracks I sure wouldn't want that to be next door while raising a young family. Doubly sure I wouldn't want it between the house, school, and all other amenities and which children/youth would be crossing on a regular basis by foot, bike, etc.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  90. #190
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    ^Maple Crest is actually at a higher elevation than Tamarack. The land generally slopes from the east to the west. Fulton Creek is a natural drainage channel that conveys drainage into the Fulton Marsh located in the northwest corner of Maple. Tamarack is generally flat, but the majority of the southern portion of the neighbourhood drains into Mill Creek and the northern into Fulton Marsh. If you want 'swampy' soils with high water tables, go to the west end.

    Statistically, these children have a much, much greater chance of being hit by a car than by a train.
    Last edited by ChrisD; 07-04-2013 at 10:15 AM.

  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    If you've followed along in the thread a combination of issues would have me concerned with the subdivision in question:

    1)Deteriorating standards in construction of current basements/foundations including unacceptable tested deviations and variance in thickness of concrete.

    2)Increased practice of pouring concrete in inclement conditions, rain, excessive groundwater, non dry areas, or in colder temperatures or colder ground conditions.

    3)This subdivision being located in what was known marsh land. With visibly very little infill separating it from its original and surrounding state.

    4)Most substrata in this area is clay, subject to settling, movement, and producing shifting stress on any concrete basement, foundation.

    5)Add continuous uncontrolled vibration to this through the entire concrete curing process and this exacerbates issues already had with the above.

    6)Add continous, ongoing, longterm excessive vibration and it isn't going to help mitigate any of the problems noted above.

    but alas it is buyer beware. There are of course many other reasons not to by in this subdivision. For instance that the resale market for these properties will be poor.
    i have highlighted in bold those points you are trying to make that, whether or not that they are valid (and they may well be), have nothing to do with tamarack per se in that as much as they apply (per some of my earlier posts) they apply to most of the edmonton region.

    i have highlighted in italics those points you are trying to make that amount to nothing but conjecture on your part and where there is anecdotal evidence (per some of my earlier posts) that you are wrong.

    that leaves two things. firstly, there is your concern that what was "marsh land" was not adequately dealt with by the engineers and geotechnical consultants and the earthwork contractors and the city of edmonton throughout the design and approval and construction process. if that wasn't the case, then - again - that concern would certainly not be limited to tamarack.

    secondly is your assertion that the resale market for tamarack will be poor. on that point, i guess it's simply a question of whose crystal ball is better but in mine the same things that make tamarack an attractive community now will continue to make it an attractive community in the future while those things that are less attractive are already factored into the current pricing which means it will perform much like any other community when it comes to resale values.

    buyer beware? most certainly - but that's no different outside of tamarack than inside tamarack either is it?
    Just to be clear my latter comments are more specific to the Maple Crest subdivision. We won't agree on this topic, nor on your assertion that the bolded points are wrong.

    I disagree that the lots or community is priced accordingly with loss in value factored in. On the contrary in this, and Tamarack very little deviation in lot pricing occurred close to, or farther from tracks.

    just as an aside, and the developer must have taken down the specific schematic map, but one of the recent adverts had a diagram of Maple Crest featuring the very convenient school nearby(and which neglected to point out that there is a main national freight line running directly between the two.) Perhaps somebody pointed out how this *convenience* was very misleading.

    Again buyer beware but with the amount of children that have been killed on traintracks I sure wouldn't want that to be next door while raising a young family. Doubly sure I wouldn't want it between the house, school, and all other amenities and which children/youth would be crossing on a regular basis by foot, bike, etc.
    if there is a disagreement on the bolder items it is with your attribution of their underlying issues to tamarack instead of to the region where - to the extent they may be valid - it belongs.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  92. #192

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    I remember I was looking at this neighborhood a year ago due to the houses being so cheap compared to other areas. Luckily I didn't buy a place in Tamarack. The people saying there is no train noise and you hardly notice it have to have brainwashed themselves at this point. Even the Landmark salesman tried to B.S. me about the noise and wouldn't you know it just as I exited the showhome and was getting in my car the train rolled by and yeah, Tamarack was not the place for me.

    I bought a place in Wild Rose which is just west of Tamarack and I'm over on 23 Street and I can hear the train whistle no problem with all the windows closed. I can hear the actual train running when I'm in my backyard. Now if I can hear it and I'm a fair distance away then I can't imagine what the people who back onto the tracks have to deal with. We're not talking a train whistle during only the day I'm talking 2 a.m. and they blow that thing, good luck sleeping when you've got that going on.

  93. #193

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Hollywood View Post
    The people saying there is no train noise and you hardly notice it have to have brainwashed themselves at this point.
    More likely they are selling property in this neighborhood or another one with trains, or they have purchased and realize they need to downplay the problem. Its buyer beware though, its like buying a house a few blocks from 124 street, and then noticing the johns circling all night as they look for a hooker. Or getting a new home in a new neighborhood, then finding out there will be no school for a decade or two. You have to research and not just sign on with the salesman, wherever you go, sounds like you were smart in doing this. I don't have much sympathy for people who don't.

  94. #194

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    If you own a lemon of a car are you gonna tell everybody that it is a lemon or will you say its great and hope someone takes it off your hands?
    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

  95. #195

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    This thread is full of a whole lot of stupid. Quite comical actually.. May the keyboard experts keep us entertained

  96. #196
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    I lived beside the tracks at an intersection where they blew their whistles all the time. The train would make the house shake and the windows rattle. But it's true, after a while I never even woke up to it, just got used to it I guess.

  97. #197

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    This thread is full of a whole lot of stupid. Quite comical actually.. May the keyboard experts keep us entertained
    You've got to have some interest in Tamarack. You either live there, are with the builders or a salesman.

    You don't need to be an expert when you can step out on your deck and hear the trains rolling and the train whistles from inside your house. Mind you I live just over 2 km away from the tracks so it's not like I'm talking out my butt here.

  98. #198
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    Quite true. You can get used to noise. I used to live two blocks from the CP line in Leduc (train horns were still allowed at that time - a later bylaw outlawed them). There are four road/rail crossings in Leduc, so you got a regular dose of two long blasts, one short, and another long blast at all hours of the day and night. Never really bothered by it all.

    And most folks in Leduc get to hear jets in and out of EIA. I don't remember that being a problem, either.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

  99. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by howie View Post
    Quite true. You can get used to noise. I used to live two blocks from the CP line in Leduc (train horns were still allowed at that time - a later bylaw outlawed them). There are four road/rail crossings in Leduc, so you got a regular dose of two long blasts, one short, and another long blast at all hours of the day and night. Never really bothered by it all.

    And most folks in Leduc get to hear jets in and out of EIA. I don't remember that being a problem, either.
    Planes flying directly over head freak me out anytime I'm driving or walking around Leduc. Can't imagine people could get used to that. I suppose they do, but how enjoyable can that be?

    Personally I'm a light sleeper. Virtually anything can wake me up. Then its hard getting back to sleep. But I'm far from alone and a vast range of sleep patterns and ability to adapt exist. I could not possibly live in Tamarack. The trains would wake me up every time. To wit I've camped in the mountains a lot. I can't sleep at Lake Louise Campground even in a good trailer. I've spent a week at a time there and don't adapt. Despite hiking 20K days and being active all day and bone tired still can't sleep well there. Trains woke me up every time. How long would it take to adapt if this is actually accurate(It of course depends on sleeping pattern.
    The Train tracks are closer at Tamarack then they are at Lake Louise. Couldn't imagine how anybody could sleep through that although I imagine theres people that could sleep through jackhammers and earthquakes.

    But heres the thing. Living right next to freight train tracks would bother most people and with most not even considering buying in such an area. Which of course makes buying in Tamarack a resale disaster. Any reasonable property in the city would sell before these.
    Last edited by Replacement; 05-10-2013 at 08:51 AM.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  100. #200

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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by howie View Post
    Quite true. You can get used to noise. I used to live two blocks from the CP line in Leduc (train horns were still allowed at that time - a later bylaw outlawed them). There are four road/rail crossings in Leduc, so you got a regular dose of two long blasts, one short, and another long blast at all hours of the day and night. Never really bothered by it all.

    And most folks in Leduc get to hear jets in and out of EIA. I don't remember that being a problem, either.
    Planes flying directly over head freak me out anytime I'm driving or walking around Leduc. Can't imagine people could get used to that. I suppose they do, but how enjoyable can that be?

    Personally I'm a light sleeper. Virtually anything can wake me up. Then its hard getting back to sleep. But I'm far from alone and a vast range of sleep patterns and ability to adapt exist. I could not possibly live in Tamarack. The trains would wake me up every time. To wit I've camped in the mountains a lot. I can't sleep at Lake Louise Campground even in a good trailer. I've spent a week at a time there and don't adapt. Despite hiking 20K days and being active all day and bone tired still can't sleep well there. Trains woke me up every time. How long would it take to adapt if this is actually accurate(It of course depends on sleeping pattern.
    The Train tracks are closer at Tamarack then they are at Lake Louise. Couldn't imagine how anybody could sleep through that although I imagine theres people that could sleep through jackhammers and earthquakes.

    But heres the thing. Living right next to freight train tracks would bother most people and with most not even considering buying in such an area. Which of course makes buying in Tamarack a resale disaster. Any reasonable property in the city would sell before these.
    Exactly. You can get the same property you would in Tamarack in other new neighborhoods like Laurel, Laurel Crossing, Walker Lakes etc. Landmark, AVI, Lincolnberg etc. all pretty much have multiple neighborhoods where they put up houses.

    Word of warning to those still looking at Laurel and are thinking of getting a duplex there. It's a parking nightmare as for some reason they decided to put duplexes on both sides of the street unlike other neighborhoods where you have a duplex on one side and a single family home on the other so there's some room as people can park on driveways. Basically, since they made the streets the standard size every street becomes a one way as you won't fit two cars on it at the same time. I used to live there and got out before things got too crazy over there.

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