Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 61213141516
Results 1,501 to 1,506 of 1506

Thread: Which Fighter Jet should Canada choose?

  1. #1501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sundance View Post
    While we wait the expensive F35, Warthogs will be operational until late 2030s
    https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/y...il-late-2030s/
    At the current rate of Governmental progress on this file, I'm willing to bet that some of our F-18A's will also be flying well past 2030.

    And that is pretty sad for a G8 level Nation.

    But such is life.

  2. #1502
    Addicted to C2E
    Mr. Reality Check

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    13,230

    Default

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/air...ters-1.5265665

    at the end of the day, the f-35 is still the front-runner and likely the best option in terms of both performance and cost.

    if we hadn't had to work through a silly election promise that canada would "never buy" the f-35 and that we would "save billions as a result that would be reallocated to the navy" (which really meant reallocated to shipyard owners that i'm sure are all politically unbiased and impartial in their contributions and support), we wouldn't have had a second set of f18's to fly on sky-hooks and scavenged parts while waiting for what could have been in service already to be delivered.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  3. #1503

    Default

    Yeah, they're working out just peachy.

    The Pentagon's Latest Assessment Of The F-35 Is In, And It Ain't Pretty
    Jared Keller January 30, 2019 at 02:08 PM

    The egregiously expensive and notoriously unreliable F-35 Joint Strike Fighter are even more of a disappointment than you previously thought, according to a new Department of Defense assessment obtained by Bloomberg News.




    The 2018 report from the Pentagon's operational testing and evaluation arm, set for public release this week and obtained early by Bloomberg's Tony Capaccio, indicates that ongoing reliability issues have drastically shortened the service life far below expectations, so far that there's "no improving trend in" available aircraft for training and combat missions — a dangerous combination for a perpetually buggy aircraft.


    Here are some of the specifics, per Bloomberg's report:


    The service life of the F-35B variants adopted by the Marine Corps "may be as low as 2,100 [hours]," an eye-popping shortfall compared too the expected service life of 8,000 hours.
    "Interim reliability and field maintenance metrics to meeting planned 80% goal not being met," which means fewer aircraft available to actually train on and, therefore, increased barriers to improving readiness among aviators.


    Cybersecurity testing indicated that several vulnerabilities revealed in previous years "still have not been remedied," an alarming tend in an age of cyberattacks.


    Testing on the Air Force weapons systems used in air-to-ground attack indicates "unacceptable" accuracy, a detail which might explain why someone opted to leak a video of an F-35A hitting 5 precision targets at once earlier in January.

    https://taskandpurpose.com/pentagon-...ssessment-2018
    And

    The Pentagon is battling the clock to fix serious, unreported F-35 problems
    By: Valerie Insinna
    June 12

    WASHINGTON — Over the past several years, U.S. Defense Department leaders have gone from citing technical problems as their biggest concern for the F-35 program to bemoaning the expense of buying and sustaining the aircraft.


    But the reality may be worse. According to documents exclusively obtained by Defense News, the F-35 continues to be marred by flaws and glitches that, if left unfixed, could create risks to pilot safety and call into question the fighter jet’s ability to accomplish key parts of its mission:


    F-35B and F-35C pilots, compelled to observe limitations on airspeed to avoid damage to the F-35’s airframe or stealth coating. Cockpit pressure spikes that cause “excruciating” ear and sinus pain. Issues with the helmet-mounted display and night vision camera that contribute to the difficulty of landing the F-35C on an aircraft carrier.


    These are some of the problems with the jet that the documents describe as category 1 deficiencies — the designation given to major flaws that impact safety or mission effectiveness.

    The F-35’s logistics system currently has no way for foreign F-35 operators to keep their secret data from being sent to the United States.


    The spare parts inventory shown by the F-35’s logistics system does not always reflect reality, causing occasional mission cancellations.


    Cabin pressure spikes in the cockpit of the F-35 have been known to cause barotrauma, the word given to extreme ear and sinus pain.


    In very cold conditions — defined as at or near minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit — the F-35 will erroneously report that one of its batteries have failed, sometimes prompting missions to be aborted.


    Supersonic flight in excess of Mach 1.2 can cause structural damage and blistering to the stealth coating of the F-35B and F-35C.


    After doing certain maneuvers, F-35B and F-35C pilots are not always able to completely control the aircraft’s pitch, roll and yaw.


    If the F-35A and F-35B blows a tire upon landing, the impact could also take out both hydraulic lines and pose a loss-of-aircraft risk.


    A “green glow” sometimes appears on the helmet-mounted display, washing out the imagery in the helmet and making it difficult to land the F-35C on an aircraft carrier.


    On nights with little starlight, the night vision camera sometimes displays green striations that make it difficult for all variants to see the horizon or to land on ships.


    The sea search mode of the F-35’s radar only illuminates a small slice of the sea’s surface.


    When the F-35B vertically lands on very hot days, older engines may be unable to produce the required thrust to keep the jet airborne, resulting in a hard landing.

    https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019...f-35-problems/

    Good thing Canada doesn't have cold or dark or seas to worry about.

  4. #1504
    Addicted to C2E
    Mr. Reality Check

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    13,230

    Default

    ^

    "Last week, the U.S. Navy stood down its entire fleet of Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and EA-18G Growlers following an accident at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station in Washington state. As a result, the bulk of the Navy’s strike fighter force was effectively out of action for almost four days...."

    https://nationalinterest.org/blog/th...et-fleet-18797

    albeit this was from 2016, it was still more than 6 years after the super hornet was put in to service. hopefuly boeing will solve the 737 supermax issues faster than it resolved those surrounding the super hornet.

    this isn't to say the f-35 is perfect, just to point out that, regardless of what is purchased, it may well not be perfect. but neither is our current fleet. those responsibe for flying our fleet however, have pretty much overwhelmingly come out in favour of the f-35 and their opinions have gone a long way in forming my own on which plane is the best choice.



    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  5. #1505
    C2E Hard Core Contributor
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Where ever the pilot takes me
    Posts
    2,332

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    this isn't to say the f-35 is perfect, just to point out that, regardless of what is purchased, it may well not be perfect. but neither is our current fleet. those responsibe for flying our fleet however, have pretty much overwhelmingly come out in favour of the f-35 and their opinions have gone a long way in forming my own on which plane is the best choice.

    No matter what desk jockeys like ourselves think there are realities that the professionals have to deal with. First of all is the limited long term viability of the other choices that exist in the market place. They are all older designs and there's only so much you can do their basic designs. Then there is the issue of interoperability and integration. When most of your allies fly the same plane and you don't you could find yourself looking from the outside in future operations. Especially in the case of the F-35 whose operational paradigm depends on the plane being able to integrate into a network that can share data and situational awareness.
    Did my dog just fall into a pothole???

  6. #1506

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by norwoodguy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    this isn't to say the f-35 is perfect, just to point out that, regardless of what is purchased, it may well not be perfect. but neither is our current fleet. those responsibe for flying our fleet however, have pretty much overwhelmingly come out in favour of the f-35 and their opinions have gone a long way in forming my own on which plane is the best choice.
    No matter what desk jockeys like ourselves think there are realities that the professionals have to deal with. First of all is the limited long term viability of the other choices that exist in the market place. They are all older designs and there's only so much you can do their basic designs. Then there is the issue of interoperability and integration. When most of your allies fly the same plane and you don't you could find yourself looking from the outside in future operations. Especially in the case of the F-35 whose operational paradigm depends on the plane being able to integrate into a network that can share data and situational awareness.
    Yep...that's the crux of the matter

Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 61213141516

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •