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Thread: Driver Distraction law... is it working?

  1. #501
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    And this is why I never bothered with a Wiki link because you would fabricate some bullcrap about how wrong it was. Ok then, you dig around. Regardless, it's a known fact that hands free and hand held are both equally distracting. It's not so much because of the hand held one-hand deal, it's because they're both equally mentally distracting. Got it? MENTALLY DISTRACTING. The same distraction is occurring, just one is held in your hand.

    Why do I have a feeling you're trying to justify your distracted driving.

  2. #502

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    I'm not trying to justify anything. I'm saying that holding a phone in your hand and talking on it, or texting, is more distracting than NOT talking on a phone at all. However, talking on a built-in Bluetooth device is LESS distracting than holding your phone. I'm not saying it's not distracting at all, I'm saying it's LESS. L. E. S. S. That gov't link YOU posted even proves that.

    It's also less distracting to drive by yourself compared to having a passenger with you and having a conversation, but that's not illegal. Holding your phone to your head and gabbing away while doing 20 under the limit, not signalling and drifting in your lane is CLEARLY distracting, and ILLEGAL. This is the problem, clearly and obviously. If you can't see that, you're oblivious.

  3. #503
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    Kitlope didn't want to use Wikipedia, but I'm lazy, so I will:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile...ndsfree_device

    Driving while using a handsfree cellular device is not safer than using a hand held cell phone, as concluded by case-crossover studies,[1][2] epidemiological,[3][4] simulation,[5] and meta-analysis.[6][7] The increased cognitive workload involved in holding a conversation, not the use of hands, causes the increased risk.[22][23][24] For example, a Carnegie Mellon University study found that merely listening to somebody speak on a phone caused a 37% drop in activity in the parietal lobe, where spatial tasks are managed.[25] The consistency of increased crash risk between hands-free and hand held cell phone use is at odds with legislation in many locations that prohibits hand held cell phone use but allows hands-free.
    You're welcome to check out the multiple sources and citations for yourself.

    Even if your argument that it's not AS distracting is true, which per the above isn't the case, but assuming it was, it's essentially the equivalent of arguing that it's okay to drive kind of half drunk because it's not as bad as driving totally blasted. I don't think that's going to quite do it for the family of someone you killed because you couldn't just pull over to take the call, or not answer it in the first place.

  4. #504
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    Thank You Marcel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Kitlope didn't want to use Wikipedia, but I'm lazy, so I will:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile...ndsfree_device

    Driving while using a handsfree cellular device is not safer than using a hand held cell phone, as concluded by case-crossover studies,[1][2] epidemiological,[3][4] simulation,[5] and meta-analysis.[6][7] The increased cognitive workload involved in holding a conversation, not the use of hands, causes the increased risk.[22][23][24] For example, a Carnegie Mellon University study found that merely listening to somebody speak on a phone caused a 37% drop in activity in the parietal lobe, where spatial tasks are managed.[25] The consistency of increased crash risk between hands-free and hand held cell phone use is at odds with legislation in many locations that prohibits hand held cell phone use but allows hands-free.
    You're welcome to check out the multiple sources and citations for yourself.

    Even if your argument that it's not AS distracting is true, which per the above isn't the case, but assuming it was, it's essentially the equivalent of arguing that it's okay to drive kind of half drunk because it's not as bad as driving totally blasted. I don't think that's going to quite do it for the family of someone you killed because you couldn't just pull over to take the call, or not answer it in the first place.
    Yes, well I'm not lazy, clearly you are, or you would have read the sources.

    Sources in said article
    #1 ) Used artificial hazards and crashes at random times and applied them to phone records of people who agreed to participate. 2/3 were using handheld devices, and in the limitations section, they clearly state that the results were biased.
    #2 ) Does not distinguish handheld and handsfree in their stats.
    #3 ) Also does not distinguish handheld and handsfree in their stats.
    #4 ) Is just a paper which discusses the results from source #1
    #5 ) Link doesn't work
    #6 ) Actually states in section 7.1 that using a handheld device IS more distracting and that further research needs to be done to differentiate the two, because they are commonly thrown together, which is wrong.
    #7 ) Is a broken link.

    So, again, what evs. I've read through enough and seen nothing. Don't post wikipedia links, the contents can be made by anyone, and the sources don't even match up half the time. Please stop wasting both of our time.

    Your comment about driving half-drunk is childish. I'm done arguing with you. I can't take you seriously.

  6. #506
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    In all fairness, it's not the chatty on the phone types that really concern me, it's the folks playing with their phones & texting while driving that is the real issue.

  7. #507

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    In all fairness, it's not the chatty on the phone types that really concern me, it's the folks playing with their phones & texting while driving that is the real issue.
    Well for me it's both, but yes, definitely even more so for the texters because they have their eyes off the road for far too long.

  8. #508
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    Police hop on a bus to spot sneaky texters

    Drivers who text behind the wheel have gotten good at hiding the habit, so Quebec police have stepped up their spotting tactics with a bus that gives them a better view of bad behaviour.Police and highway patrollers have hopped on board the new pilot project, which sees them scanning the roads from inside a large bus. They say the elevated view helps them catch drivers texting.

    "We see a lot of people who have a cellphone at the wheel, to talk or text, on their thigh," said Isabelle Gaudreau from Quebec traffic control.

    "It's not the sort of thing we can see when we're in a patrol vehicle. But in the bus, we see it clearly."

    While officers in the bus observe drivers from above, a dozen police cars follow behind to intercept those who've been flagged.

    In addition to the use of cellphones while driving, the operation revealed other infringements of the Highway Safety Code.

    "The seat belt also — it surprised us to see how much, especially drivers of heavy vehicles," said Gaudreau.

    The pilot project began Tuesday and officials are already calling it a success — more than 70 tickets were handed out in just a few days in Quebec City and on the province's highways.

    "We've had excellent results, above our expectations," said Gaudreau.

    Motorists who are caught texting and driving face a $120 fine and four demerit points.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...-bus-1.3787641

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    Police were pulling people over on Whyte Ave again the past few days. I spoke to an officer who said they had been there 45 mins, and pulled over more than 20 people. It's really nice to see them actually doing enforcement of this.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

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    And just in case for the people that believe we don't need to penalize distracted driving (the ol' nanny state argument), the stupid is thick and real with this one.

    Topless selfie student crashes into Texas police car

    A US college student has crashed into a police car while taking a topless selfie behind the wheel, say officials.

    Miranda Rader, 19, rear-ended the patrol vehicle while sending nude photos to her boyfriend through the social media app Snapchat, police say.

    The accident on Wednesday in Bryan, about 100 miles (160km) north of Houston, caused the airbag to deploy.

    The Texas A&M University student also had an open bottle of wine in a cup holder by her, according to police.

    No one was injured in the incident.

    The officer whose car had been hit approached Ms Rader to find she had an "unclasped brassiere" and was trying to put on her blouse, police said.

    The freshman told the officer that she had been driving back to her residence on campus.

    The arresting officer wrote in an affidavit: "I asked her why she was not dressed while driving and she stated she was taking a Snapchat photo to send to her boyfriend while she was at a red light."

    She was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and released from jail on Thursday morning on a $2,000 (Ł1,600) bail bond, police said.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37795008

  11. #511
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    From The Province (BC):

    Distracted driving penalties could be stiffened, minister warns

    VICTORIA — B.C.’s top cop is prepared to consider stiffer sanctions for distracted driving, including impounding vehicles, if current penalties fail to reduce deaths and injuries.

    Solicitor General Mike Morris said it’s too early to assess the impact of new fines and demerit points that came into effect June 1.

    “I still want to see a year’s worth of data before I jump to any conclusions here,” he said. “I think in some areas it is having an effect — some of the smaller communities where the messages seem to get out a little bit more.”

    But he said it appears to be taking longer to have an impact in major cities.

    “When I drive around some of the more populated areas in the province, I’m still discouraged to see the number of people that have a phone stuck up to their ear or the ones that are looking down at their lap after the light turns green,” he said.

    ICBC says distracted driving is responsible for 27 per cent of all fatal crashes in B.C. each year. On average, 10 people die in distracted driving-related crashes on Vancouver Island, the agency said.

    The province has more than doubled the fine for using a hand-held electronic device while driving to $368 from $167, while the number of demerit points increased to four from three. The combination of fine and increased insurance premiums totals $543.

    Morris said he’s hoping the high cost of breaking the law will have an impact.

    “But if I don’t see a drop in fatalities and serious injuries as a result of the increased penalties, then we’re going to have to look at some more stiffer sanctions in the future,” he said.

    Morris, a former RCMP superintendent, said those sanctions could include impounding vehicles.

    Victoria Police Const. Andy Dunstan said he has yet to notice a reduction in distracted driving in the capital region, where he is a member of the Integrated Road Safety Unit.

    “I personally believe that people are so used to using their phone — it is with them every waking moment — that being in a car does not override the need to be in contact through their phone, through email or whatever it is,” he said.

    “It’s a real change of attitude that people need,” Dunstan said.

    He said it’s bad enough that people are texting while driving, but they’re also going to great lengths to hide or disguise their illegal behaviour by holding phones on their laps or below their sight line.

    “That’s actually increasing the risk, because the cellphone or the iPad or whatever it is they’re using is so far out of their line of sight that their eyes are off the road for much longer to complete the same texting task or whatever.”
    http://www.theprovince.com/news/loca...253/story.html

    It's coming folks, phones and vehicles being confiscated because people are too stupid to put these things away.

  12. #512

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    The real solution is automation - there is no deterrent in the world that will get all drivers to magically be great. Even the best drivers have potentially catastrophic moments of inattention. The operation of vehicles needs to be taken away from us inherently flawed meatbags.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  13. #513

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    I've gotten into the habit of plugging my phone into the centre console USB port, partially so I can use the Spotify integration in my car & also to get the phone out of sight & mind.

    Works so well that I have to run down & get it outta the car about once a week.
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  14. #514
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    Texting making Edmonton roads 'extremely dangerous,' police chief says

    Edmonton's police chief believes it's a matter of time before someone gets killed by someone texting on their phone while behind the wheel.


    "It seems pretty ridiculous to me," said Rod Knecht at a police commission meeting Thursday.


    New numbers show that Edmonton police had written 5,585 tickets for distracted driving to the end of September this year.


    That compares with 4,455 for the same period last year, representing an increase of just over 25 per cent.


    Knecht described the upward trend as "extremely dangerous." The numbers continue to grow despite fines for distracted driving rising to $287 this year and the addition of three demerit points.


    "People have to understand they're putting themselves in jeopardy and they're putting the travelling public in jeopardy," Knecht said.


    Knecht explained that the vast majority of tickets issued in Edmonton are to people who are sending and receiving text messages, rather than those actually speaking on the phone.


    Everyone on the road has seen people looking down in their lap instead of the road or sat behind a driver who doesn't move at an intersection when the light turns green, he said.


    "You can stop at any intersection on your commute in the morning and you'll see somebody texting," said Knecht, noting he could write three or four tickets himself every morning on his commute.


    He said while distracted drivers have caused crashes on Edmonton's roads, nobody has died as a result, to his knowledge.


    The chief did not offer any official statistics, but said his officers believe younger drivers are the recipients the growing number of distracted driving tickets.


    "As soon as they get the buzz or the notification, they're on it again responding to that, so it's this immediate gratification type of thing that is a challenge for us," he said.


    Even with more than $1.6 million in tickets issued so far this year, drivers continue to care more about their phones than the road, Knecht said.


    "We can write tickets till our hands fall off," said Knecht, who said police will continue to do what they can through enforcement and public education to get the message through.
    Making green flashing arrow left turns is so painful these days

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...rous-1.3856284

  15. #515
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    National Post has a 6 part series on Distracted Driving. Some good reading for people that refuse to put down their phones.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/feature...-the-last-text

  16. #516

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    Texting making Edmonton roads 'extremely dangerous,' police chief says

    Edmonton's police chief believes it's a matter of time before someone gets killed by someone texting on their phone while behind the wheel.
    Making green flashing arrow left turns is so painful these days

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...rous-1.3856284
    I'd bet every single dollar I make in my lifetime that some amount of the deaths occurring on our roads are at the hands of people texting and driving. The hard part is proving it.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  17. #517

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
    National Post has a 6 part series on Distracted Driving. Some good reading for people that refuse to put down their phones.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/feature...-the-last-text
    I drove the highway to Camrose every other day around that time as it was part of my sales territory for the company I worked at. The John Boden collision really shook me up, even though it was a different stretch of road. I don't know if the girl ever was punished in any way, other than perhaps guilt. Same with that city worker who was killed by the girl that ran him over and smashed into the back of a city truck without even touching her brakes because she was distracted. The way we treat the use of cars as a right instead of a deeply scrutinized privilege is crazy.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  18. #518

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    The way we treat the use of cars as a right instead of a deeply scrutinized privilege is crazy.
    But that scrutiny shouldn't involve speed limits, since they're "unjust", right?
    Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

  19. #519
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    Yeah, I never quite understood police chiefs comment that "one day someone is going to get killed by distracted driving".

    What do you mean one day? It's already happened here in Edmonton and was proven in the court of law that distracted driving played a large role.

  20. #520

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    The way we treat the use of cars as a right instead of a deeply scrutinized privilege is crazy.
    But that scrutiny shouldn't involve speed limits, since they're "unjust", right?
    I absolutely believe in speed limits. I don't believe in artificially low speed limits that are used to unjustly punish drivers soley for the sake of revenue.

    Let's keep this in the other thread please. We're here to talk about distracted driving (even though I personally believe most speeding - and going too slow - is now a result of not paying attention to how fast one is going due to distractions).
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    The better way to target texting drivers: York Region police ride the bus

    A growing number of Canadian police forces are riding public transit to catch distracted drivers.

    "Being on the bus, you have the large windows and being up higher we have a very good vantage point of the drivers and their vehicles," said Sgt. Aaron Sidenberg of York Regional Police.

    "They're not suspecting that police are on the bus."

    Sidenberg says people are in the habit of hiding their phones on their laps, so police have had to adapt in targeting the problem.

    About a month ago, police in Aurora, Ont. began boarding the bus, watching passing drivers and informing patrollers which vehicles to pull over.

    Some days, Sidenberg says, they discover so many scofflaws that they can't ticket them all.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...gion-1.3907419

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    Just stop texting and driving: Editorial

    It can cost you your life, never mind a bundle in fines or even a jail sentence. But the allure of texting, perplexingly, continues to distract Canadian drivers.

    In fact, disturbing results of a poll released on Wednesday by the Canadian Automobile Association indicate some 33 per cent of respondents admit to having texted while stopped at a red light in the last month, alone.

    It has to stop. As Jeff Walker of the CAA says, the effect of texting at a light lingers well after the light turns green, making it a dangerous driving habit. He rightly points out that it is socially unacceptable to drive drunk, “and that’s where we need to get with texting.”

    Still, people continue to text and drive even though it actually causes more deaths than impaired driving.

    Indeed, the Ontario Provincial Police reported in March that distracted driving was the cause of more deaths on provincial highways than any other factor for the third consecutive year, contributing to 69 in 2015. Worse, the province reports there is a distracted driving collision every 30 seconds.

    So far, increased penalties haven’t stopped the people from texting while driving. The fine for distracted driving is a minimum $490 that a judge can increase to $1,000, plus three demerit points on conviction.

    Nor have Ontario government commercials last summer that showed a young driver taking his eyes off the road for a second to check his phone. He is violently T-boned in a collision he could have avoided if he’d been watching the road. In the next frame he’s in a wheelchair for life.

    It all adds up to one simple message: Stop driving and texting, already.
    Bolding mine. Looks like I finally have my answer after many years, always wondered if it was 1/4 or 1/3 drivers texting just from my own observations.

    https://www.thestar.com/opinion/edit...editorial.html

  23. #523
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    And in other news, driver hypocrisy is rampant.

    Edmonton drivers know better but take risks anyway, traffic study finds

    Edmonton drivers don't always walk their own talk when it comes to distracted driving or other traffic safety issues, a new survey has found.

    Results from the 2016 Edmonton traffic safety culture survey, conducted for the City of Edmonton's Office of Traffic Safety, came out Tuesday.

    The survey of more than 3,600 people suggests some big gaps between drivers' attitudes about traffic safety and their actions behind the wheel.

    Findings will be used to help support the city's Vision Zero goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries on Edmonton roads.

    "Overall, the findings of this study tell us that people are concerned about traffic safety," the study said.

    "They tell us that people find many behaviours to be a threat to their safety and unacceptable. Yet, at the same time, some people continue to engage in risky behaviours anyway."

    Two-thirds of respondents said they believe it's not acceptable to speed on residential streets, and 93 per cent said they see such speeding as a serious threat to their personal safety.

    Yet more than 43 per cent of people surveyed admitted doing it themselves in the past 30 days.
    The stupid is real. More here:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...inds-1.3939586

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    Drivers have always had to be vigilant, but now it seems that a new level of attention is required at the very time when inattentive driving is increasing at an alarming rate. Scary times. Up till now, I'd been a bit leery about self-driving cars, but what other answer is there if people can't keep their traps shut or their fingers away from a smartphone for more than a few seconds? My second question is: What the hell do people find to talk about at any and every given moment? Just STFU and drive.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

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    Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau asks provinces to stiffen penalties for distracted drivers

    OTTAWA — The federal government wants some provinces to toughen laws aimed at distracted drivers, the National Post has learned, but is not yet ready to criminalize those caught texting or talking on smartphones.

    In a letter to his provincial counterparts, federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau seeks “nationallly consistent enforcement measures and penalties” to combat a rapidly rising rate of accidents involving drivers who were using their phones at the time of the crash.

    “I would like to encourage, and facilitate as required, all jurisdictions to consider adopting measures which are both stricter in terms of their impact but also uniform across the country,” Garneau wrote in a letter sent to his provincial and territorial counterparts earlier this week. A copy of that letter was provided to the National Post by a federal government source. “Having robust and nationally consistent enforcement measures and penalties will help mitigate the negative impact of this increasingly pervasive problem on Canada’s roads.”

    In all provinces, a driver caught texting or talking on a smart phone will face a fine and demerit points but the penalties vary substantially among jurisdictions.

    For example, British Columbia has the highest fine for a first-time offender at $543 plus an assessment of four demerit points on the license holder. In New Brunswick, by contrast, the fine is $172.50 with an assessment of three demerit points. In Newfoundland and Labrador, it’s a $100 fine and four demerits.
    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/ca...racted-drivers

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    Catching distracted drivers 'like shooting ducks in a barrel,' says Edmonton police chief

    If anyone has ideas about how to stop people from texting while driving, Edmonton's top cop is all ears.

    "I don't think it's hit its peak yet," Edmonton police Chief Rod Knecht told the city's police commission Thursday.

    "I don't think the tickets are indicative of the problem. I think the problem's much worse," Knecht said.

    "Our members will write tickets but they'll just say, 'Well, I've got other work to do too [so] I can't just write distracted driving tickets all day,' " he added. "Because I think they could write distracted driving tickets all day — it is an attitudinal thing."Knecht said the police usually see younger drivers using their phones to text behind the wheel, while drivers 35 years of age and older use their phones the old-fashioned way, holding them to their faces."If it's not blatant, where the driver has got the phone up to their ear, then you see the person that's looking down, and looking down, looking down, and you pull them over right away," he said.

    The number of tickets issued backs up the chief's message.

    In the first quarter of 2015, EPS wrote 975 tickets for distracted driving. That number jumped to 1,560 in 2016, and 2,455 tickets already this year.

    "Shame on those people that are doing it because we are seeing increased accidents as a result of of it," Knecht said. "They're putting themselves in danger, they're putting the public in danger."
    Read more:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...ving-1.4122408
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    ICBC researching discounts for drivers who disable smartphones

    VICTORIA — Drivers who voluntarily agree to disable their phones inside their vehicles could one day get a break on their auto insurance, under a plan being researched by the new NDP government.

    Attorney General David Eby said he has directed the Insurance Corporation of B.C. to research the feasibility of offering insurance discounts to drivers who agree to technological measures that prevent their phones from being used, in an attempt to guard against the proliferation of distracted driving.

    “Improving road safety is critical in getting a handle on distracted driving — people using cellphones,” Eby said in an interview. “So there are other technologies we’ve asked ICBC to prepare proposals around — for example, there are plug-ins for cars that people can voluntarily take on in exchange for a reduced premium, or that new drivers could take on, that would prevent them from using their phones while driving.

    “I don’t know about the maturity of these technologies, or how pragmatic it is to be implementing them, but we should be looking at them and I’ve asked ICBC to do that.”

    ICBC is scrambling to find ways to reduce costs, after an Ernst & Young report warned of possible rate hikes of 30 per cent for motorists unless the Crown auto insurer can rein in claims costs and legal fees. The report recommended caps on certain injury claims, as well as a return to photo radar, the use of red-light intersection cameras to catch speeders, and increased police traffic enforcement to crack down on distracted driving.
    http://www.theprovince.com/news/poli...597/story.html


    Not a bad idea ...
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  28. #528

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    June 8, 2017 2:56 pm
    iPhone’s new distracted driving feature is ‘a good first step’: CAA
    http://globalnews.ca/news/3509445/ip...irst-step-caa/

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    Vancouver driver busted for attaching cellphone, tablet to steering wheel


    No hands, big problem.

    A Vancouver motorist was ticketed on Wednesday for driving with an iPhone and a tablet attached to his steering wheel.The Vancouver Police Department's traffic unit tweeted a photo of the elaborate setup. The cellphone — hooked up to a charger — appeared to be attached to the wheel with zipties. The tablet seemed to be wedged in between them.

    "Can't make it up," an officer wrote.Police handed the driver an $81 ticket for failing to produce his driver's licence but, following "a lengthy conversation about road safety," did not issue a ticket for distracted driving, according to a police spokesman.

    "Based on the information collected during their conversation, our officer decided that educating the driver about the devices would be the most effective approach," Const. Jason Doucette said in a statement.

    A distracted driving ticket comes with a $368 fine.

    It's far from the first unusual distracted driving bust in B.C. in recent weeks. On Tuesday, another Vancouver driver was ticketed for playing Pokemon Go on his iPad.He was caught after pulling up beside two officers while playing and driving. He was issued a $368 ticket.

    Last month a 51-year-old woman was hit with the same fine after she was caught playing that same game behind the wheel in New Westminster.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...heel-1.4404162
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  30. #530

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    The law is still not working. The fines need to be steeper, and police need to ACTUALLY look out for these things. I've seen people drive by a cop car with a phone to their ear several times. I've also seen people driving in the dark with only their daytime running lights on (aka, no tail lights) with a cop behind and they didn't get pulled over either. At one point in the university area I even honked at a cop next to me and pointed at the car in front of me that had no lights on in the dark and he just shrugged and ignored it. If cops would actually do their jobs, maybe people would start to give a crap about these laws.

  31. #531
    I'd rather C2E than work!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Downtown
    Posts
    4,031

    Default



    Yeah, you really have to pay attention when walking.

    Last week Top_Dawg was walking north through an intersection.

    A southbound SUV made a right hand turn around the corner right in front of Top_Dawg as if he wasn't even there.

    And sure enough, the driver was yakking into a cell phone.

  32. #532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Dawg View Post


    Yeah, you really have to pay attention when walking.

    Last week Top_Dawg was walking north through an intersection.

    A southbound SUV made a right hand turn around the corner right in front of Top_Dawg as if he wasn't even there.

    And sure enough, the driver was yakking into a cell phone.
    Since they don't even see you, that's when you palm-punch the side mirror and then hold your left upper arm like as if the mirror hit you in the arm lol

  33. #533

    Default

    I think they need to kill the distracted driving thing and work it into impaired driving. A phone to the head impairs the ability to drive, and should come with criminal charges.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  34. #534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chmilz View Post
    I think they need to kill the distracted driving thing and work it into impaired driving. A phone to the head impairs the ability to drive, and should come with criminal charges.

    LIKE!! And people will think twice when they get their cars impounded and licenses suspended! Where's that like button???

  35. #535
    C2E Hard Core Contributor
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    South Beverly Heights in a small house with a large lot!!
    Posts
    2,049

    Default

    I have a little surprise for those I see texting at a light. I pull out my air horn and let em have it. That and my camera that my passengers can take a GREAT snap of.If the noise doesn't wake them up...The embarrassment of the camera does.
    Make the RIGHT choice before you take your last breath......

  36. #536

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Dawg View Post
    Yeah, you really have to pay attention when walking.Last week Top_Dawg was walking north through an intersection.A southbound SUV made a right hand turn around the corner right in front of Top_Dawg as if he wasn't even there.And sure enough, the driver was yakking into a cell phone.
    This happens constantly during rush hour downtown (saw it 3 times in the span of walking 2 blocks today). It amazes me how "distracted" drivers can get to be oblivious to pedestrians, when there are hundreds of them in plain view.

  37. #537

    Default

    Great point:

    When can kids ride shotgun? - The Globe and Mail


    Deibert adds that, when younger children ride up front, there's also a greater chance of driver distraction. "They're fidgety and what happens is they play with the knobs, fiddle with the seat, adjust the radio, and all kinds of things. It's a distraction to the driver, and there's a fear and concern that they'll be out of position." “

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...rticle4538854/

  38. #538

    Default

    Worth watching, forwarding:


    Worlds Best Creative Road Safety TV Ads Commercials

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1ajR7dq2T8

  39. #539
    I'd rather C2E than work!
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Strathcona - Mill Creek
    Posts
    5,384

    Default

    EPS was pulling people over for distracted driving, AND they were pulling over noisy motorcycles along Whyte Ave on Saturday night. They had a ton of people (when I walked past there were probably 6 DD, and 2 motorcycles being tested)
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  40. #540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gord Lacey View Post
    EPS was pulling people over for distracted driving, AND they were pulling over noisy motorcycles along Whyte Ave on Saturday night. They had a ton of people (when I walked past there were probably 6 DD, and 2 motorcycles being tested)
    Was a busy night for the EPS because when we were going for a drive down Scona Rd towards downtown, they were sitting in that right turn behind the barriers. I thought the cop was going to pull us over and when we drove by he stared us down. I was going 58-60 so wonder if he wasn't sure what to do!

  41. #541

    Default

    You usually wont get pulled over for doing less than 10 over.

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