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Thread: Oak Tree Acorns

  1. #1

    Default Oak Tree Acorns

    Where are there any large Oak trees in Edmonton, the legislative grounds? I would like to get some acorns and try to grow some Oak trees.

    I have an small Oak tree in my front yard and the last two years someone or something has taken the acorns off the tree.

  2. #2

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    ^ my bet is on something.

    It was often hard to sell oaks at my garden center as they are a VERY large tree and pretty slow growing if I remember correct.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  3. #3

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    Well considering that someone pulled out and stole the first tree (5 foot tall) I planted in my front yard 3 years ago I tend to think it is someone.

  4. #4

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    Theft of plants is very common... believe it or not. I have not heard of anyone stealing apples, nuts etc on private property. I did take some apricots from a home that is currently vacant however.
    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

  5. #5
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    They are not large, but I see they are growing acorns. There are a few just west of the 23rd Avenue and 119 Street intersection beside the telephone distribution building.
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

  6. #6
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    There are many mature oak trees around the city mostly burr oaks. I noticed this year the acorns are quite abundant. I also noticed there are some in Rossdale between 94 and 95 avenue along the river trail.
    There is a mature red oak in someone's front yard 87ave between 142-149st on the north side. If you asked the owner I am sure he would let you take some acorns.
    “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

  7. #7

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    Consider growing Horse Chestnut too. There's a number of old ones in the city.

  8. #8
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    ^ Ah! Conkers.
    Nisi Dominus Frustra

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    100 ave west of 118 street north curb (Victoria Prominade)
    I have 5-6 or more trees that have sprung from these little acorns

    Still trying for a viable Ohio Buckeye seedling
    Still waiting for the Arlington site to be reborn .......

  10. #10
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    Default Stratifying acorns.

    This may be of help to anyone who wants to grow from seed.
    http://msucares.com/pubs/publications/p2421.pdf

    For horse chestnuts.
    http://www.ehow.com/how_7734048_plan...tnut-nuts.html
    Some difference of opinion about correct temperatures.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store...al+maintenance

    Howie you and I will have to get together and share stories about horse chestnuts. I used to live in Ealing where the whole of Ealing Common was planted with them.
    “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

  11. #11
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    froze mine in a brown paper bag in the freezer and another batch outside in a tupperware tub for a winter and they sprouted right away
    Is the guy who was doing the maint. on the chestnut on 106 alleyway still at work?
    Still waiting for the Arlington site to be reborn .......

  12. #12
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    The burr oaks that grow around here are members of the white oak sub species. The red oaks might be a little trickier.
    “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

  13. #13

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    Pin oaks anyone. I have several Burr Oaks and one Pin Oak. It's nice but I have it in the wrong spot so it's not doing well.

    Have a horse chestnut and two Ohio buckeyes all doing well. None from "seed".

  14. #14

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    Last fall a friend if mine gave me nearly 40 - 45 burr oak acorns that he’d gathered from his boulevard trees. They sat in my attached garage for months until I finally bought some potting containers and soil sometime in the spring. I expected that I’d left them way to long to be viable. I did the float test and about 30 passed that test so they each got a little container in the flat. Then I stuck in next go them the ones that failed.

    This summer most of the containers sprouted two little oaks. My neglect at watering and leaving them in the hot sun on the deck caused 10+ to die.

    Today I planted them out at the cabin where we already have 5 or 6 doing quite well. (One is in full sun and growing horrible soil.). I expect many won’t make it but I’ll be thrilled if one or two survive without any TLC.




    Neighbourhood loses living piece of history | CTV Edmonton News
    August 3, 2010
    Some Bonnie Doon residents are questioning the nature of development after a rare Burr was chopped down Tuesday.

    “The tree, believed to be between 60 and 75 years old, was one of three of its kind in Edmonton. It was...”
    https://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/neighbou...story-1.538600
    Last edited by KC; 01-10-2018 at 12:23 AM.

  15. #15
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    ^

    for those wondering, 60 - 75 years isn’t old for a burr oak. they typically live 200 - 300 years and 400 isn’t uncommon.
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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    And they aren’t so uncommon. Thousands have been planted over the years and are doing very well.
    “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

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