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Thread: buy toyota hybrid highlander

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    Default buy toyota hybrid highlander

    I am looking to buy a new or slightly used or demo highlander hybrid awd . how do find out and get the best price out from the dealer in edmonton? any leads? thank you in advance.

  2. #2

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    Just prepare for the add on charges that they put on the paperwork. I bought a used Subaru and paid the extra billing the Edmonton Subaru dealer tacked onto it. From what I'd heard and read is that those charges are either against the associations rules, possibly against the law or against something or other but some dealers are still applying them. My dealer said they were legally compliant because they were openly disclosed, etc. but I had my doubts but I'm not going to worry over a few hundred dollars. That said, did I mention that it was an Edmonton Subaru dealer, a west side, Edmonton Subaru dealer?

    So I'd really advise you to ask about this as soon as you hit the lot then decide if you're willing to pay it or not and if not, make that a condition of even looking at any vehicle. I think it's there because they generally have the leverage in negotiations at the end of the dealing. They did in my case because I wasn't prepared to walk away at that point over the added charges.
    Last edited by KC; 29-04-2014 at 11:23 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    So I'd really advise you to ask about this as soon as you hit the lot then decide if you're willing to pay it or not and if not, make that a condition of even looking at any vehicle. I think it's there because they generally have the leverage in negotiations at the end of the dealing. They did in my case because I wasn't prepared to walk away at that point over the added charges.
    Same thing happened to my girlfriend when she was buying a used car. They charged a $500 "administration" fee. What they used to do was give you a spiel about that idiotic "anti-theft tagging" that they would do to parts of the vehicle and give you the impression that it was required, and charge you $500 for it. AMVIC slapped them down for that: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...uest-1.1317652

    Now instead, they tell you that the admin fee is required (which it isn't), and that they're kindly throwing in the anti-theft tagging as a bonus or some crap.

    Unfortunately at that point my girlfriend was so emotionally invested in buying the vehicle (long story, previous car was stolen) that she didn't want to walk away. On top of that, she didn't even attempt to negotiate on the list price (she went back to the dealership to provide proof of income without me, and the salesman sprung the exact car she was looking for on her when I wasn't there), the front tires were bald, and it needed $600 of body work once I took a closer look at it and realized it had been in accidents and poorly repaired. She paid $2-3,000 more for a 2010 Matrix than she should have, because she just wanted it over with.

    Have I mentioned I despise car dealerships?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdixit View Post
    I am looking to buy a new or slightly used or demo highlander hybrid awd . how do find out and get the best price out from the dealer in edmonton? any leads? thank you in advance.
    I hate to say it but I'd avoid the Toyota dealerships. There seems to be a bit of a pervasive attitude of entitlement, as they seem to feel as though, especially when it comes to the trucks & SUV's , that because it's a Toyota, They should not have to work to attract business. And for disclosures' sake, I am a big fan of Toyota, and believe that they are still the best vehicle manufacturer on the planet.

    I bought my Slightly used Tacoma from Londonderry Dodge. They just happened to have the truck I was looking for. But they treated me very well through the whole thing and I got a very good deal on the truck.

    The S.O. was looking at a 4Runner a few months back, but we drove a Highlander also and we both agreed that the Highlander is a very nice SUV (I still prefer the 4Runner though) Prices for even a 2 year old Highlander are still very high.
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    thank you all for your feedback. My car was a write off in a road accident, and am looking to buy a used car. But the 2-3 used toyota or honda or nissan are very high and the 10 year old vehicles with 200k kms come at no less than 7k either, I am in a fix as to buy which one is more better. Would apprececiate any feedback on this. I am looking for a used reliable suv pref. AWD. Had been to dealers here in Edmn, no one gives the fair price, they all are jacked up and try to bargain , and the kijiji ones are too high priced than the canada black book value and get nasty replies if I ask for the fair price, please help as to where to look around. thanks.
    Thank you in advance.

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    I agree with the above - be clear you are negotiating an "all-in" price and be ready to walk away if they try to tack on any extra charges after you agree on a price.

    The hybrid AWD system on the Highlander is interesting - conventional FWD transaxle with electric motors only in the back. Not sure why all hybrids don't works that way, as you get both AWD and hybrid from a FWD with a minimum of extra parts.

  8. #8

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    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdixit View Post
    thank you all for your feedback. My car was a write off in a road accident, and am looking to buy a used car. But the 2-3 used toyota or honda or nissan are very high and the 10 year old vehicles with 200k kms come at no less than 7k either, I am in a fix as to buy which one is more better. Would apprececiate any feedback on this. I am looking for a used reliable suv pref. AWD. Had been to dealers here in Edmn, no one gives the fair price, they all are jacked up and try to bargain , and the kijiji ones are too high priced than the canada black book value and get nasty replies if I ask for the fair price, please help as to where to look around. thanks.
    Thank you in advance.
    if all of the vendor's pricing - both dealer and private - is consistently higher than your expectations of what you should pay, it may be that your expectations are too unrealistically low. it takes time for a vendor to respond to ad or kijiji listing inquiries (home to answer the phone, home to show the car etc.) and that is time away from everything from work to you kid's soccer to mother in law's birthday party. that's fair enough - they are actually the one's trying to sell a car but if you are taking their time and "low balling" a price while insisting it's fair and they are unreasonable, that might explain some of their response (particularly if they have other interest or offers closer to their expectations than your offer). keep in mind as well that "canada black book values" won't reflect local demand or the strength of local markets - it would appear your own "market research" is proving that out for our market.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.
    if it was only that simple/true...

    one of the problems with ecu's (and other on board electronics) is that they are proprietary and vehicle specific and often only for a specific model for a specific year.

    the original package is controllable by the manufacturer - they make as many as are ordered (or as many as they are prepared to build on spec). they can then control pricing and quantities and build time etc.

    from there it gets more complicated. how many replacement components should be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? how long should they continue to be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? should that be done for each and every component, for the complete subsystem or for something in between? at some point in time, those components are like pentium 3's and windows 3.11. oem replacements simply become unavailable and the systems that rely on them fail and need replacement because repair is no longer possible.

    unfortunately, with cars the vehicle itself becomes the unrepairable system (or repairable only at great expense because of the scarcity - not the manufacturing cost - of the failed component).
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    if all of the vendor's pricing - both dealer and private - is consistently higher than your expectations of what you should pay, it may be that your expectations are too unrealistically low. it takes time for a vendor to respond to ad or kijiji listing inquiries (home to answer the phone, home to show the car etc.) and that is time away from everything from work to you kid's soccer to mother in law's birthday party. that's fair enough - they are actually the one's trying to sell a car but if you are taking their time and "low balling" a price while insisting it's fair and they are unreasonable, that might explain some of their response (particularly if they have other interest or offers closer to their expectations than your offer). keep in mind as well that "canada black book values" won't reflect local demand or the strength of local markets - it would appear your own "market research" is proving that out for our market.
    Having been on the other end of things, it can be incredibly frustrating when you're selling a vehicle to get flooded with poorly written emails and texts "offering" 30-40% less than what I'm asking, without even bothering to look at the vehicle first. That's a huge pet peeve of mine. Don't make me a low ball offer when you haven't even looked at the damn thing. That being said, it does seem like the used car market is pretty pricey in Edmonton/Alberta these days. I think primarily because car sales bottomed out in 2009/10, so there's just not a lot of used vehicles that are 3-4 years old floating around out there.

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    thank you, will take note of it,

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.
    if it was only that simple/true...

    one of the problems with ecu's (and other on board electronics) is that they are proprietary and vehicle specific and often only for a specific model for a specific year.

    the original package is controllable by the manufacturer - they make as many as are ordered (or as many as they are prepared to build on spec). they can then control pricing and quantities and build time etc.

    from there it gets more complicated. how many replacement components should be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? how long should they continue to be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? should that be done for each and every component, for the complete subsystem or for something in between? at some point in time, those components are like pentium 3's and windows 3.11. oem replacements simply become unavailable and the systems that rely on them fail and need replacement because repair is no longer possible.

    unfortunately, with cars the vehicle itself becomes the unrepairable system (or repairable only at great expense because of the scarcity - not the manufacturing cost - of the failed component).
    That's one of the great things about having a "toy" car that is 30 years old, still fun to drive and easy to find parts for. I have several Bosch ECU's for my Volvo on my parts shelf in the garage that I pay $20 each for from the pick-n-pull. They take about 20 minutes to change

    Last edited by 240GLT; 02-05-2014 at 12:41 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    if all of the vendor's pricing - both dealer and private - is consistently higher than your expectations of what you should pay, it may be that your expectations are too unrealistically low. it takes time for a vendor to respond to ad or kijiji listing inquiries (home to answer the phone, home to show the car etc.) and that is time away from everything from work to you kid's soccer to mother in law's birthday party. that's fair enough - they are actually the one's trying to sell a car but if you are taking their time and "low balling" a price while insisting it's fair and they are unreasonable, that might explain some of their response (particularly if they have other interest or offers closer to their expectations than your offer). keep in mind as well that "canada black book values" won't reflect local demand or the strength of local markets - it would appear your own "market research" is proving that out for our market.
    Having been on the other end of things, it can be incredibly frustrating when you're selling a vehicle to get flooded with poorly written emails and texts "offering" 30-40% less than what I'm asking, without even bothering to look at the vehicle first. That's a huge pet peeve of mine. Don't make me a low ball offer when you haven't even looked at the damn thing. That being said, it does seem like the used car market is pretty pricey in Edmonton/Alberta these days. I think primarily because car sales bottomed out in 2009/10, so there's just not a lot of used vehicles that are 3-4 years old floating around out there.
    I sold my '99 Tacoma on Kijiji. What a sh*t show with phone calls from people asking if I'd take $1500 when the asking proce was $4200 firm, people asking for my bank account info because they were "out of town and wantedto buy it sight unseen" , asking stupid questions like "do the turn signals work", asking if I could take a checque from a friend of theirs who would come by to look at it.. no e-mails from a Saudi prince this go-around though.

    It was very simple. Cash goes in my hand, and you get the truck. But I had to deal with a lot of BS. I'll be selling our Acura here shortly on Kijiji.. I expect the same amount of absurdness
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    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.
    if it was only that simple/true...

    one of the problems with ecu's (and other on board electronics) is that they are proprietary and vehicle specific and often only for a specific model for a specific year.

    the original package is controllable by the manufacturer - they make as many as are ordered (or as many as they are prepared to build on spec). they can then control pricing and quantities and build time etc.

    from there it gets more complicated. how many replacement components should be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? how long should they continue to be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? should that be done for each and every component, for the complete subsystem or for something in between? at some point in time, those components are like pentium 3's and windows 3.11. oem replacements simply become unavailable and the systems that rely on them fail and need replacement because repair is no longer possible.

    unfortunately, with cars the vehicle itself becomes the unrepairable system (or repairable only at great expense because of the scarcity - not the manufacturing cost - of the failed component).
    That's one of the great things about having a "toy" car that is 30 years old, still fun to drive and easy to find parts for. I have several Bosch ECU's for my Volvo on my parts shelf in the garage that I pay $20 each for from the pick-n-pull. They take about 20 minutes to change

    30 years? probably barely broken in...

    from my perspective, anything still on the road doing what it was intended to do after 30 years should probably be considered a "real" car, not a "toy" car.

    as an aside, if you have a "real" car that is 22 years old and buy another one that is exactly the same, does that make them a combined 44 years old?
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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    I don't understand why car manufacturers don't put more functions into software / firmware so they could use a common ECU across all vehicles. Just program it with vehicle-specific software.

    The failures noted on the Edmonds forum generally involved a FET in the inverter that powers the electric motor. This part (the inverter) is common to a range of model years and has a long technological heritage in industrial motor controls. It should not cost $9000, and the ECU should not completely disable the car when it fails - it should only disable the hybrid electrics.

  18. #18

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    jdixit, are you using all the space in the SUV for passengers, or is some of it for cargo? You can get roof or tail racks for bikes, skis, or other bulky cargo that may help you make do with a smaller vehicle.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.
    if it was only that simple/true...

    one of the problems with ecu's (and other on board electronics) is that they are proprietary and vehicle specific and often only for a specific model for a specific year.

    the original package is controllable by the manufacturer - they make as many as are ordered (or as many as they are prepared to build on spec). they can then control pricing and quantities and build time etc.

    from there it gets more complicated. how many replacement components should be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? how long should they continue to be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? should that be done for each and every component, for the complete subsystem or for something in between? at some point in time, those components are like pentium 3's and windows 3.11. oem replacements simply become unavailable and the systems that rely on them fail and need replacement because repair is no longer possible.

    unfortunately, with cars the vehicle itself becomes the unrepairable system (or repairable only at great expense because of the scarcity - not the manufacturing cost - of the failed component).
    That's one of the great things about having a "toy" car that is 30 years old, still fun to drive and easy to find parts for. I have several Bosch ECU's for my Volvo on my parts shelf in the garage that I pay $20 each for from the pick-n-pull. They take about 20 minutes to change

    30 years? probably barely broken in...

    from my perspective, anything still on the road doing what it was intended to do after 30 years should probably be considered a "real" car, not a "toy" car.

    as an aside, if you have a "real" car that is 22 years old and buy another one that is exactly the same, does that make them a combined 44 years old?
    Yes

    But hey Ken my TR-7 is now 38 so its getting close to your 2X22

    Tom

  20. #20

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    @jdixit

    I was in your position 2 years ago. I kept checking kijiji for a highlander hybrid. There was a white 2009 on the lot of Toyota dealer in whyte ave. after following it for a couple of months ( they kept re-posting it so that it doesn't show how long it has remained on the lot), I went in to negotiate. I started 5k below the asking price and mentioned I have followed this car and it seems a hard sell, so let's negotiate.... Guess what...they didn't even come with a counter offer. They just said flat no!!!....so finally I managed to get a highlander from a local shop......you know what happened to that white hybrid?...... After 3-4 month they reduced the priced to what I offered that day... Still took another 2-3 month before the ads on kijiji disappeared, ....basically the greedy dealers prefer the car rot on their lot to let it go at a fair price....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by 240GLT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ustauk View Post
    Here's a thread about having issues with the hybrid power train on the Highlander. According to the Toyota Warranty page, the battery and other parts of the hybrid system are covered for the first 160,000 KM. If you do want to get the hybrid, leasing might be a better option, as you'll be handing it back to the dealer before the warranty on the hybrid power train expires.
    Failing electronic parts are understandable, but the bad programming and price gouging on replacement parts is not. A properly programmed ECU would not disable the whole car after a failure of the hybrid system (it should just become a non-hybrid FWD), and there is no way a part of the hybrid system should cost $9000 when all of the parts together were a $6000 option. 1/10 of that price would be reasonable.
    if it was only that simple/true...

    one of the problems with ecu's (and other on board electronics) is that they are proprietary and vehicle specific and often only for a specific model for a specific year.

    the original package is controllable by the manufacturer - they make as many as are ordered (or as many as they are prepared to build on spec). they can then control pricing and quantities and build time etc.

    from there it gets more complicated. how many replacement components should be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? how long should they continue to be ordered/built/paid for/warehoused and inventoried? should that be done for each and every component, for the complete subsystem or for something in between? at some point in time, those components are like pentium 3's and windows 3.11. oem replacements simply become unavailable and the systems that rely on them fail and need replacement because repair is no longer possible.

    unfortunately, with cars the vehicle itself becomes the unrepairable system (or repairable only at great expense because of the scarcity - not the manufacturing cost - of the failed component).
    That's one of the great things about having a "toy" car that is 30 years old, still fun to drive and easy to find parts for. I have several Bosch ECU's for my Volvo on my parts shelf in the garage that I pay $20 each for from the pick-n-pull. They take about 20 minutes to change

    30 years? probably barely broken in...

    from my perspective, anything still on the road doing what it was intended to do after 30 years should probably be considered a "real" car, not a "toy" car.

    as an aside, if you have a "real" car that is 22 years old and buy another one that is exactly the same, does that make them a combined 44 years old?
    Yes

    But hey Ken my TR-7 is now 38 so its getting close to your 2X22

    Tom
    maybe so, but the jag gets out every day all year long...
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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    Ah yes but I haven't had mine long enough to say the same

    TH

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
    Ah yes but I haven't had mine long enough to say the same

    TH
    let me know if you're ever stuck for a lift...
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
    Ah yes but I haven't had mine long enough to say the same

    TH
    let me know if you're ever stuck for a lift...
    Coming from one English car driver to another....pot meet kettle...kettle meet pot

    LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by kcantor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
    Ah yes but I haven't had mine long enough to say the same

    TH
    let me know if you're ever stuck for a lift...
    Coming from one English car driver to another....pot meet kettle...kettle meet pot

    LOL
    yeah, yeah... next thing you'll be having us buy lucas refrigerators so we could drink warm beer...
    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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