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Thread: Should our post-secondaries become more rural focused or distributed?

  1. #1

    Default Should our post-secondaries become more rural focused or distributed?

    Right now it seems we basically concentrate most post-secondary education in Edmonton and Calgary. Would greater and more widely distributed geographic presence help more rural Albertans get post-secondary education with lower overal costs and hardship to them and serve to better support if not diversify our smaller communities?
    Last edited by KC; 16-10-2016 at 08:58 PM.

  2. #2

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    They already do that. Things like Athabasca University is essentially that. Then there are plenty of smaller post-secondary schools: UofA augustana campus in Camrose, Grande Prairie College, Red Deer College, Medicine Hat College, Keyano College, etc...

    I don't think you're going to find 1-high school towns suddenly opening up universities, it doesn't make sense. I don't understand this thread, but just wanted to point out that post-secondary education is not basically concentrated in Edmonton or Calgary. Most full Degree and Post-grad? yes, but post-secondary in general seems to be nicely distributed geographically within the province.

  3. #3
    I'd rather C2E than work!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perspective View Post
    They already do that. Things like Athabasca University is essentially that. Then there are plenty of smaller post-secondary schools: UofA augustana campus in Camrose, Grande Prairie College, Red Deer College, Medicine Hat College, Keyano College, etc...
    Also Lakeland in Vermilion/Lloydminster, Olds College, U of Lethbridge, Blue Quill in St Paul, Grande Prairie Regional College in Fairview, etc.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex.L View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Perspective View Post
    They already do that. Things like Athabasca University is essentially that. Then there are plenty of smaller post-secondary schools: UofA augustana campus in Camrose, Grande Prairie College, Red Deer College, Medicine Hat College, Keyano College, etc...
    Also Lakeland in Vermilion/Lloydminster, Olds College, U of Lethbridge, Blue Quill in St Paul, Grande Prairie Regional College in Fairview, etc.
    They aren't for example: 'The University of Alberta, Grande Prairie', etc.

    So I guess in my mind the questions are: Are they all equals and are they all perceived as equals, and does a rural student have an equal opportunity or does someone coming to Edmonton receive a greater benefit and does that only occur at a greater cost? Do the sourcing communities benefit or loose as their kids leave for higher levels of education?

    Beyond this, is our educational system damaging or destroying various rural cultures due to any inaccessibility, cost or other issues?
    Last edited by KC; 16-10-2016 at 10:17 PM.

  5. #5

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    Uhm no.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex.L View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Perspective View Post
    They already do that. Things like Athabasca University is essentially that. Then there are plenty of smaller post-secondary schools: UofA augustana campus in Camrose, Grande Prairie College, Red Deer College, Medicine Hat College, Keyano College, etc...
    Also Lakeland in Vermilion/Lloydminster, Olds College, U of Lethbridge, Blue Quill in St Paul, Grande Prairie Regional College in Fairview, etc.
    They aren't for example: 'The University of Alberta, Grande Prairie', etc.

    So I guess in my mind the questions are: Are they all equals and are they all perceived as equals, and does a rural student have an equal opportunity or does someone coming to Edmonton receive a greater benefit and does that only occur at a greater cost? Do the sourcing communities benefit or loose as their kids leave for higher levels of education?

    Beyond this, is our educational system damaging or destroying various rural cultures due to any inaccessibility, cost or other issues?
    A good quality university requires a relatively large population to draw from. Think about all the specialized programs offered at the U of A. There is no way to replicate that in a smaller centre because there wouldn't be enough students to populate these programs.

  7. #7
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    No, for the simple fact that what makes the large institutions what they are is that they are large institutions. Logistically there is no way they could offer the services they do without being centralized. I think the mix of smaller, teaching institutions spread across the province along with the larger research and teaching institutions in the centres works well. I also don't think this disadvantages rural students at all. The fact of the matter is whether it's work or education, as an adult, you have to go to where that is.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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