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Thread: Edmonton Marijuana Dispensaries

  1. #1

    Default Edmonton Marijuana Dispensaries

    Thread to discuss Edmonton's municipal plans as we progress down the legalization path. Latest article from the Journal here mentions how the city is considering restricting zoning to prevent the proliferation that Vancouver has seen. I agree it should be managed properly, but I hope to see it be privatized like liquor stores so we get choice and entrepreneurial innovation.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    But drinking liquor near a store doesn’t affect bystanders the same way a cloud of pot smoke would, Nickel said: “As an intoxicant, how are you going to deal with that?”
    If Nickel is worried that people might get intoxicated from walking by places where marijuana is being consumed, I think he can put his mind at ease. I won't say that contact-highs are mythological in the sense that unicorns are mythological, but I'd say they're a pretty rare creature in any case. If it were that easy to get a second-hand stone, you'd have a lot more people just showing up at parties weedless, and just breathing the air to get high. (Though I guess you could eventually end up with a free-rider problem.)

    Plus, he seems to be talking about people walking OUTDOORS, breathing the smoke coming out of a shop. That makes psychoactive impact even less likely.

    That said, I'm still hedging my bets on the posssibility of full legalization of recreational marijuana. I could see the whole thing getting bogged down in inter-jurisdictional squabbles, eg. if it's gonna be sold in liquor stores, a few provinces will say they don't want to do that, and the feds won't be able to force them, etc etc.

    And, if you read his statements carefully, Trudeau says that his goal in legalization is to keep it away from kids(because the black market supposedly makes it more accessible), not to make it easier for stoners to indulge. This gives him the perfect escape hatch if he wants to back down: "Upon further study, we've found that legalization might actually make it easier for kids to get stoned, so..." And then loosen the rules on medical marijuana a bit to give the impression that he's fulilling his promises.

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    That quote stood out to me as well. Either he's woefully informed on the potency of marijuana smoke, or he's fear mongering.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/randi...ct-high-2014-1

    That being said, I don't imagine legalization will permit smoking in public anyways, so it's a total non-concern. Just like you can't walk down the street drinking a six pack, nor will you be able to smoke a joint. In Nickel's example, the people consuming both the liquor and the marijuana apparently right outside the door are breaking the law, and would face ticketing or arrest. So what's the big concern in that specific example?

    In general though, I do agree that there will need to be restrictions on where the shops can open, if that's the way legalization goes. Personally, I can't stand how many awful looking liquor stores there are scattered around every nook and cranny. Which is why I think that grocery stores should be able to sell at least a limited selection of beer and wine, as that would put a fair number of the small independents out of business. For pot, I'm not sure what distribution model makes the most sense. It probably doesn't make sense to sell it in liquor stores, for a variety of reasons, but mostly because from a public health perspective it's probably best not to be selling two intoxicants in the same place. I don't think pharmacies should be selling recreation pot for the same reasons they shouldn't be selling booze or tobacco (medicinal makes sense, of course).

    So likely a dispensary model makes the most sense, but they're just so damn tacky. I was on a motorcycle trip through Washington a little over a month ago, and the sheer number of them along the highway through every town was pretty surprising to me. And it seemed like 50% of the billboards I went by were advertising for it as well. I have zero problems with recreational pot use, I just don't want to see a massive proliferation of ugly storefronts similar to what we already have with liquor.
    Last edited by Marcel Petrin; 03-11-2016 at 03:58 PM.

  4. #4

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    I see kids/teens still drinking and smoking tobacco all the time. Legalization won't change much for pot either. I'm all for it though. Silly double standard and missed revenue opportunity for governments.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    the sheer number of them along the highway through every town was pretty surprising to me. And it seemed like 50% of the billboards I went by were advertising for it as well. I have zero problems with recreational pot use, I just don't want to see a massive proliferation of ugly storefronts similar to what we already have with liquor.
    I think we're still witnessing this because it's new. Fast forward a few years and I think it will die down, especially as it becomes common. This screams "tourists, smoke weed here!" which won't mean a thing as legalization creeps it's way into the mainstream. I imagine liquor and strippers are the same way in places where it's legal, right next to jurisdictions where it is/was not.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

  6. #6

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    Policing will be an issue.

    However, below, you'll see an example of a very poor article. It implies cause and effect without providing any data to show that the accidents were caused by smoking dope. Legalize the stuff and a whole lot more people may then use it, even more will breath it as second hand smoke, so of course, it will be in their blood. ...but at what concentration? I'd assume that they'd know that considering that there were fatalities.

    Note: I would expect more accidents and deaths in some respects and fewer deaths in other respects.

    Rocky Mountain data: Big increase in fatal crashes since pot legalized
    Jack Encarnacao Thursday, October 13, 2016
    http://www.bostonherald.com/news/loc..._pot_legalized

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    So likely a dispensary model makes the most sense, but they're just so damn tacky.
    The dispensaries I saw in Victoria looked really cool. I didn't know what they were until I asked a guy coming out of one. It just looked like a really cool storefront.
    They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

  8. #8

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    Edmonton did have a dispensary run for 10+ Years providing access to Medical Paients. MACROS - amazing people. But thats a side note. Federally after Legalization the only thing that makes sense is to allow storefront dispensaries.

    As the current model stands LPs (Licensed Producers - companies allowed to grow Medical pot) are NOT allowed to operate storefronts. All Cannabis must be sent through the mail. Also the redtape to become an LP is insane, which is why we dont have a lot more.

    I imagine Trudeau will 'flick the switch' so to say with the LPs and allow them to have storefronts OR allow any Joe Blow operate a storefront but all their product must be purchased through the already established LPs.

    Either way aside from basic zoning regulations I hope we see an abundance of Dispensaries once Legalization happens.
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    Another escape hatch for the Liberals, should they choose to dump their promise...

    http://tinyurl.com/hgqcfls

    "This legislation is going to be a model for the world. So Canadians want to ensure it's done in the safest way possible. When the new technology for testing drivers is in, we'll be implementing the laws to begin the legalization of weed!"

    In other words, not before the next election.

    (fictional quote)
    Last edited by overoceans; 10-01-2017 at 09:21 AM.

  10. #10

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    ^oh my, it could be decades before that technology comes... Crazy stuff, because it doesn't stop people using this drug. Just legalize it already, if the US states can, why can't Canada? I'm guessing Trudeau is struggling with because he won't be a good boy scout with the UN anymore then...

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    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^oh my, it could be decades before that technology comes... Crazy stuff, because it doesn't stop people using this drug. Just legalize it already, if the US states can, why can't Canada? I'm guessing Trudeau is struggling with because he won't be a good boy scout with the UN anymore then...

    Yeah, legalizing it at the federal level would put us at odds with a bunch of international treaties, which would kind of complicate the Liberal narrative about how virtuous Canada is for always acting multilaterally etc.

    There is a legitimate debate to be had(not that I think we should have it here) about just how detrimental marijuana is to driving; not all drugs have the same impact on spatial perception that alcohol does. And it's arguable that medicines containing opioids(some of which are OTC in Canada) would have a worse effect on driving, yet we seem to be cool with that risk.