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Thread: Are you boycotting BC?

  1. #501

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    About 6 parts to this series. Most important to note is that some companies set up improved relationships 30 years ago and that way back in 2004 everyone got a heads up that development wouldn’t be able to steamroll over indigenous lands anymore.


    First Nations series: Staking claims in the B.C. economy

    http://www.vancouversun.com/life/fir...173/story.html


    First Nations series: Natives seen as better protectors of the land despite occasional clashes

    http://www.vancouversun.com/technolo...121/story.html
    Last edited by KC; 22-12-2018 at 06:24 AM.

  2. #502

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbones View Post
    Eagle Spirit president says pipeline from northern Alberta to Prince Rupert, B.C. could win NEB approval | Globalnews.ca

    “He says Eagle River has 100 per cent Indigenous backing along its route “

    “However, he repeated a threat to move the shipping point of the project to Alaska if the federal government approves Bill C-68, which would ban oil tankers from loading on the north coast.”

    https://globalnews.ca/news/4486622/e...ce-rupert-neb/
    Last edited by KC; 22-12-2018 at 06:26 AM.

  3. #503

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    Leave Victoria's 'raw sewage' alone, Alberta

    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada...-alone-alberta

  4. #504

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    Unceded territories and elected chiefs vs. hereditary chiefs


    Travelling the pipeline: Why the Secwepemc Nation is crucial for the Trans Mountain pipeline - APTN NewsAPTN News





    “It’s about jurisdiction over the band’s territory. He said the deal – and he credits Kinder Morgan for being “very transparent” throughout the negotiations – gives the community environmental oversight, including the ability to hire its own engineers to work on the pipeline.

    “The pipe could send apple juice. I really wouldn’t care. I want the environmental oversight and I want the tax authority. That’s what I want,” he says. “For me, it’s a jurisdiction issue.

    “We were fighting each other long before Canada got here.” ...”


    https://aptnnews.ca/2018/04/26/trave...tain-pipeline/
    Bands vs the people:

    Indigenous resistance, title make Trans Mountain pipeline extension ‘untenable,’ says economist - APTN NewsAPTN News

    “Cochrane says while discussion of the Trans Mountain controversy has centred on financial risk associated with legal and jurisdictional disputes between the province of British Columbia and the federal government, the project’s greatest financial threat is the risk associated with running the pipeline through unceded Indigenous lands.”

    ...

    Nicole Schabus, an assistant law professor at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, says while about half the Trans Mountain pipeline route crosses through Secwepemcul’ecw – the unceded territory of the Secwepemc people – Canada has never obtained their free, prior and informed consent.

    She says when Kinder Morgan suspended non-essential spending they pointed to the province of B.C. for the hold-up.

    “But the biggest uncertainty, legal and economic, comes from Indigenous peoples,” Schabus said.

    The Trans Mountain pipeline was built in 1953, at a time when Indigenous people couldn’t legally organize around the question of land title and jurisdiction, Schabus explains.

    Since then multiple Supreme Court of Canada decisions have strengthened Indigenous Peoples’ land rights, title and jurisdiction in decision-making processes about what happens on their unceded territories where no treaties exist that give title to the Crown.

    At least four Secwepemc First Nations along the pipeline route have signed onto the project, but Schabus says Aboriginal title and jurisdiction belong to the Secwepemc people themselves – not the bands established under Canada’s Indian Act – and the people are the “proper rights holders.”


    https://aptnnews.ca/2018/06/08/indig...s-economist-2/
    Elected chiefs vs. hereditary chiefs:

    Elected vs. hereditary chiefs: Pipeline showdown puts spotlight on division of power | CTV News Vancouver

    “But do both the elected chiefs and the hereditary chiefs speak for the group as a whole? Or does one take precedence?

    Elected chiefs

    Elected chiefs were created out of the Indian Act of 1876 by colonialists who came to North America, seized Indigenous Land and attempted to put their own system into place.

    The act created the elected chief and council system. These representatives are subject to elections held every two years.

    "It's incredibly simple," says Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, with the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs when asked about the differences. "Band councils have authorities, powers and jurisdiction on the reserve land base itself. And where the border of the reserve ends, so ends their power and jurisdiction."

    https://bc.ctvnews.ca/elected-vs-her...ower-1.4247466
    Last edited by KC; 10-01-2019 at 05:50 AM.

  5. #505

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    The minister was caught misspoking - consultations may be back on soon.

    Funny how people everywhere seem to want to be consulted.

    Alberta government waffles on Bighorn Country public consultations, will reschedule after backlash | Globalnews.ca


    There was a strong backlash, both online and in the form of a rally in Drayton Valley on Monday, where protesters voiced anger over what they called a lack of proper consultation.


    https://globalnews.ca/news/4828974/a...s-rescheduled/


    Trudeau apologizes for First Nation consultation failures on Trans Mountain pipeline

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he didn't expect "unanimity" from First Nations on the Trans Mountain pipeline project but apologized for his government's failure on consultation after a speech to the Assembly of First Nations on Tuesday.
    ...

    In a rare move, Trudeau, who has spoken to the AFN more times than any other prime minister, stayed to take unscripted questions from the floor.

    He immediately faced two pointed questions on the Trans Mountain pipeline project.

    "There was no consent," said Neskonlith First Nation Chief Judy Wilson.

    Wilson said mutual benefit agreements signed by some First Nations on the project did not amount to the consent of the people.

    "We have to get a proper process of consent, prime minister," said Wilson.

    The pipeline crosses about 513 km of the Secwepemc Nation, of which Neskonlith is a member.

    Trudeau, who addressed Wilson by her first name, said the British Columbia chief should be "careful" about "minimizing" positions taken by other First Nations that "disagree" with her.


    https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/t...line-1.4932663



    Last edited by KC; 10-01-2019 at 06:01 AM.

  6. #506
    C2E Hard Core Contributor
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    Another interesting wrinkle in the Coastal GasLink pipeline brouhaha:

    In addition to opposition from the hereditary chiefs of Wet'suwet'en Nation, the proposed Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline faces another battle that TransCanada says could put the project at risk.The National Energy Board (NEB) launched a multi-step process last fall to determine whether the $4.8-billion pipeline should fall under federal jurisdiction and perhaps undergo further regulatory review ​potentially delaying the project for months.

    A hearing has not yet been scheduled, but the NEB has listed several filing deadlines between January and March.

    The 675-kilometre pipeline, which would move natural gas from Groundbirch, B.C., to Kitimat, B.C., for international export was cleared by provincial officials by April 2016. It is owned by TransCanada Corp., now officially known as TC Energy.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/c...view-1.4971829

    It's somewhat emotionally satisfying to see BC Premier John Horgan possibly hung up on his own petard. On the other hand, the Shell LNG project also benefits Alberta by off-shoring some Northeastern BC natural gas to Asian markets, rather than having it flow through our province adding to the already glutted North American market.

  7. #507

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    Albertans should shun BC travel over province's 'holier than thou' attitude: Columnist | Daily Hive Vancouver
    March 4, 2019

    https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/calg...-about-bc-2019

    B.C. downplays tourism fears amid pipeline spat with Alberta, businesses call for cooler heads | Globalnews.ca
    April 9, 2019

    https://globalnews.ca/news/5148509/b...-spat-alberta/



    Should Albertans boycott B.C. travel over pipeline spat?

    CTVNews.ca Staff
    with reports from CTV Calgary’s Brenna Rose and CTV Vancouver’s St. John Alexander
    Published March 5, 2019

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/should...spat-1.4322720

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/canada...spat-1.4322720
    Last edited by KC; 14-04-2019 at 09:45 AM.

  8. #508
    C2E Continued Contributor
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Downtown Edmonton
    Posts
    1,765

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    Quote Originally Posted by East McCauley View Post
    Another interesting wrinkle in the Coastal GasLink pipeline brouhaha:

    In addition to opposition from the hereditary chiefs of Wet'suwet'en Nation, the proposed Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline faces another battle that TransCanada says could put the project at risk.The National Energy Board (NEB) launched a multi-step process last fall to determine whether the $4.8-billion pipeline should fall under federal jurisdiction and perhaps undergo further regulatory review ​potentially delaying the project for months.

    A hearing has not yet been scheduled, but the NEB has listed several filing deadlines between January and March.

    The 675-kilometre pipeline, which would move natural gas from Groundbirch, B.C., to Kitimat, B.C., for international export was cleared by provincial officials by April 2016. It is owned by TransCanada Corp., now officially known as TC Energy.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/c...view-1.4971829

    It's somewhat emotionally satisfying to see BC Premier John Horgan possibly hung up on his own petard. On the other hand, the Shell LNG project also benefits Alberta by off-shoring some Northeastern BC natural gas to Asian markets, rather than having it flow through our province adding to the already glutted North American market.
    Just finished my engineering program. That project is in my crosshairs as I landed a job in the LML. Heres to hoping both provinces can thrive together.

  9. #509

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    How do Vancouver’s, Victoria’s etc landfills compare with those in Alberta?

    The daily volumes might be a sign as to the amount of wasteful bad-for-the-environment consumption occurring in each jurisdiction.


    See these:

    15 of the Worlds Largest Landfills With Photos and Statistics | Owlcation

    https://owlcation.com/stem/15-of-the...gest-Landfills









    Vancouver:

    https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/vanco...final-2017.pdf



    That’s the dumps: Edmonton failing at diverting waste from landfill, audit finds – Edmonton Journal

    https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...agement-centre




    Kitchen waste piling up in Edmonton landfill since compost facility closed last fall

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmon...stem-1.4565158
    Last edited by KC; Yesterday at 08:41 AM.

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